Updates & New Announcements ~ Monday 4/24 thru Wednesday 4/26 (from Adrienne Fong)

Updates:

A. Donald Trump on US charging Julian Assange: ‘It’s OK with me’

Mr Assange has been living in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London for five years

4/21/17

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/donald-trump-julian-assange-wikileaks-response-a7696326.html

B. Officials Provide Details of Latest Counter-ISIS Strikes in Syria, Iraq

From a Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve News Release

April 22, 2017

https://www.defense.gov/News/Article/Article/1160239/officials-provide-details-of-latest-counter-isis-strikes-in-syria-iraq/

C. Petition: Cease Military Intervention and Involvement in Syria

White house Petition on Syrian Military intervention 

D.Chelsea Manning is supposed to be released on May 17th from Fort Leavenworth. (let’s hope that the DOJ and President Trump do NOT reverse this decision!) You can still write her at:

   Write to Chelsea (through the first week of May 2017) at this address:

Mail must be addressed exactly as follows:

CHELSEA E. MANNING 89289
1300 NORTH WAREHOUSE ROAD
FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS 66027-2304

Send items for posting by 12 Noon on Wednesdays to: afong@jps.net 

Occupy

~ San Francisco ~

Occupy San Francisco Bulletin Board

 http://www.occupysf.net

NEW ANNOUNCEMENTS

Monday 4/24 – Wednesday 4/26

1.  Monday, 1:30pm – 3:00pm, Say ‘NO’ to the Chop Shop Legislation (CANCELLED)

SF City  Hall, Room 250
1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Pl.
SF

There is more anti-homeless legislation at City Hall!  Legislation will be heard at the Land Use Committee.

This is an ordinance that would amend the Police Code to prohibit the taking apart or rebuilding of bikes, having bike parts, or selling bike parts in public spaces, and allows citations, impound fees, and the seizure of those parts. (See FB site for details of legislation)

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1687332008235927/

2.  Monday, 6:00pm – 8:00pm, Town hall meeting on the next Mission homeless shelter (FB site looks like it is sponsored by gentrifiers!)

Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts
2868 Mission St.
SF

Come out to SUPPORT a proposed new Navigation Center and AGAINST the HATE this group is promoting! Below is the FB announcement that the folks that have taken over the Mission and Bernal areas are saying:

“Supervisor Ronen and Mayor Lee prematurely announced this homeless shelter in the SF Chronicle — the city has no lease yet even — and they need to demonstrate that the neighborhood is in favor. So your voice matters. 

Attend the town hall meeting on Monday April 24th to stop yet another Milton shelter at 1515 S. Van Ness @ 26th st.

These shelters attact crime, drug abuse, encampments, and human waste to the neighborhood — and there are three elementary schools nearby.

This would be the second such shelter in the Mission. 90% of San Francisco’s other Supervisor Districts have none, even though the Mission has only 6% of the city’s homeless. Other districts need to pitch in first!”

Clarification – Supervisor Ronen has called for the Town Hall – the group posting on FB is calling people to speak out against the Navigation Center.

The name of the group is Protect the Mission https://www.facebook.com/Protect-the-Mission-187217041797715/

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1250465511732976/

3.  Monday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, OccupyForum – Film: A Fierce Green Fire by Mark Kitchell

The Black and Brown Social Club
474 Valencia St. (nr. 16th St. BART)
SF

Film being shown in celebration of “Earth Day”

Inspired by the book of the same name by Philip Shabecoff, and informed by advisors like Edward O. Wilson, A FIERCE GREEN FIRE chronicles the largest movement of the 20th century and one of the keys to the 21st. It brings together all the major parts of environmentalism and connects them. It focuses on activism, people fighting to save their homes, their lives, the future – and succeeding against all odds

Film unfolds in five acts:

1.David Brower and the Sierra Club’s battle to halt dams in the Grand Canyon

2. Lois Gibbs and Love Canal residents’ struggle against 20,000 tons of toxic chemicals

3. Paul Watson and Greenpeace’s campaigns to save whales and baby harp seals

4. Chico Mendes and Brazilian rubbertappers’ fight to save the Amazon rainforest

5. Bill McKibben and the 25-year effort to address the impossible issue – climate change

Tuesday, April 25

4.  Tuesday, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Refuse Fascism Teach – in @ SFSU

San Francisco State University
Cesar Chavez Student Union
Richard Oakes Multicultural Center
SF

Trump/Pence Regime is a Fascist Regime. Not insult or exaggeration, this is what it is. For the future of humanity and the planet , we, the people must drive this regime out. 
Join with others from different perspectives to engage and learn about the nature of this administration, what this will mean for humanity and what we can do to stop it. Now is a crucial time for people to deeply confront what is actually happening in this country and act. This teach in is part of efforts on campuses around the country to mobilize to oust the regime

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/24/18798744.php

5.  Tuesday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Peace Tour 2017: Bay Area

First Congregational Church of Oakland
2501 Harrison St.
Oakland

Wheelchair & BART accessible

Donation $10.00. no one turned away

Refreshments served.

Join the International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines (ICHRP) Northern California Network 
for the Bay Area event of the
 #JustPeacePH Peace Tour 2017….

A Peoples’ Movement for a Just Peace
Understanding the Root Causes of the Armed Conflict in the Philippines.

 Program will feature Filipino human rights experts and indigenous people who have survived the brunt of state-sponsored violence and political repression in the Philippines

See FB site for bios and more info

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1298017660319121/

6.  Tuesday, 6:15pm – 7:45pm, Raising Healthy Children in a Commercialized World

Chabot Elementary School
6686 Chabot Road
Oakland

Commercialism is a factor in many of the key problems facing children today, including obesity, eating disorders, youth violence, increased materialism and the erosion of the creative play

In this workshop, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood’s (CCFC) Executive Director, Josh Golin, will describe how advertising has evolved, how this maps on different stages of childhood, and what we can do – as parents and communities – to give kids the commercial free time and space they need in order to thrive. Pre-registration is appreciated: http://bit.ly/chabot425 

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/21/18798670.php 

Wednesday, April 26

7.  Wednesday 8:30am – 5:30pm,  Single Payer Now Bus to Sacramento for Senate Committee Hearing on SB 562 (See # 9)

Single Payer Bus to Sacramento – MUST MAKE A RESERVATION

Contact Don for info at: 415-810-5826

8:30am – sharp from Civic Center in SF

9am from Ashby BART

We will leave after the vote on SB 562. We should be back by 5:30pm.

8.  Wednesday, 9:30am – 2:00pm, Immigrant Family Day/ Dia de la Familia Inmigrante

SF City Hall
1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Place
SF

The San Francisco Immigrant Legal & Education Network (SFILEN) is a unique and groundbreaking collaboration of thirteen organizations

We represent immigrants from African, Arab, Asian, and Latino communities.

Every year, SFILEN holds Immigrant Family Day, a day of civic engagement where we gather clients, members, and families from each district who have received our services at City Hall to ask the Board of Supervisors and the Mayor’s office to continue supporting San Francisco’s immigrant families. 

Layout of Event:
Resource Fair- 10am-2pm 
Welcome by Mayor Ed Lee
Visits with Supervisors

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/885386718278881/

9.  Wednesday, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Sacramento Rally & Senate Health Committee Hearing SB 562’s first vote

Sacramento Convention Center Complex
1400 J Street
Sacramento

Rally and March – pack the room to show that SB 562 needs to be moved forward.

11:00am Rally

12:15pm, March to the Capitol

1:30pm, Hearing Senate Health Cmte.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/13/18798284.php

10.  Wednesday, 5:30pm – 6:30pm, PEACE VIGIL

One Post St.
(On the steps facing Market St. – below Feinstein’s office)
Above Montgomery BART
SF

All are welcomed to join Codepink, World Can’t Wait, OccupySF and Others.

Look for the bright lettered pink PEACE banner.

Rain or Shine.

Theme this week: Relationship of War & Climate

11.  Wednesday, 6:00pm – 7:00pm, Vigil for Amilcar Perez-Lopez Killed by SFPD on February 26, 2015

Folsom St. between 24th & 25th Streets
SF

Now that the DA has announced his decision in Amilcar’s case, our Wednesday vigils at Mission Police Station have ended. We are in a new phase now, but our demands for justice continue.

We will be meeting at the site where Amilcar was murdered by SFPD.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/groups/353672264838421/

12.  Wednesday, 6:30pm – 8:30pm, Land Rights Now Screening and Potluck

Seed the Commons
Beale & Folsom Sts.
SF

Seed the Commons joins the global#LandRightsNow

Join us for a vegan potluck and an informal conversation on the importance of securing indigenous and community land rights everywhere. We’ll watch a few short videos on land rights struggles around the world and discuss their relevence to the SF Bay Area and what is already being done here. 

This event is held at the home of one of our organizers near the Transbay Terminal and Embarcadero Bart station. Pm us for the address.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/999292450205336/ 

13.  Wednesday, 7:30pm – 9:00pm, April New Moon Ceremony: Defend Mother Earth

Cesar Chavez Park
11 Spinnaker Way
Berkeley

This will be the 20th Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty New Moon Ceremony.

“We call upon our sisters and their allies around the world to gather together on each new moon to pray for the sacred system of life, guidance and wisdom.” These words come from the historic Indigenous Women of the Americas – Defending Mother Earth Treaty Compact of 2015, which was signed on the day of the fourth Blood Moon, the Harvest Moon and the total eclipse on Sunday, September 27, 2015 on Lenape Territory in New York City.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/399993570399674/

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OccupyForum presents . . . “A Fierce Green Fire” by Mark Kitchell

OccupyForum presents…

OccupyForum Film in Celebration of Earth Day:
A Fierce Green Fire by Mark Kitchell
Monday, April 24th from 6 – 9 pm at The Black and Brown Social Club
474 Valencia Street near the 16th Street BART station
Information, discussion & community! Monday Night Forum!!
Occupy Forum is an opportunity for open and respectful dialogue
on all sides of these critically important issues!
 
​This past Saturday was Earth Day with worldwide demonstrations such at Saturday’s March For Science, where tens of thousands took to the streets of San Francisco to tell the Trump regime that science and facts are more important than personal hunches and short term profits for fossil fuel investments. There probably has never been a time when we needed greater awareness of our natural world and the peril it’s in than now. Virtually all climate scientists agree that life on our planet is under dire threat from global warming and climate chaos, and that the time to take action was yesterday, but that if we engage in large-scale programs of conservation and remediation, we may stave off the worst effects of this crisis.

It’s against this backdrop that the new US administration proceeds with its agenda to dramatically cut back on the budgets of the EPA and most other environmental programs which would have reduced carbon emissions. It is also aggressively cutting regulations of the fossil fuel industry to greatly increase their extraction and burning. An argument could be made that this approach is not only about short term greed but may even have a suicidal, apocalyptic aspect – the Trump administration is full of zealots.

Awareness of how people have fought against giant corporations and government agencies which threatened our well-being, and that of the planet, could be very helpful now as we plan our paths of resistance against these insane, fossil-fuel addicts. That’s where this film comes in! Inspired by the book of the same name by Philip Shabecoff, and informed by advisors like Edward O. Wilson, A FIERCE GREEN FIRE chronicles the largest movement of the 20th century and one of the keys to the 21st. It brings together all the major parts of environmentalism and connects them. It focuses on activism, people fighting to save their homes, their lives, the future – and succeeding against all odds.

The film unfolds in five acts, each with a central story and character:
  • 1) David Brower and the Sierra Club’s battle to halt dams in the Grand Canyon
  • 2) Lois Gibbs and Love Canal residents’ struggle against 20,000 tons of toxic chemicals
  • 3) Paul Watson and Greenpeace’s campaigns to save whales and baby harp seals

    4) Chico Mendes and Brazilian rubbertappers’ fight to save the Amazon rainforest

  • 5) Bill McKibben and the 25-year effort to address the impossible issue – climate change

Surrounding these main stories are strands like environmental justice, going back to the land, and movements of the global south such as Chipko in India and Wangari Maathai in Kenya. Vivid archival film brings it all back and insightful interviews shed light on the events and what they mean. The film, which is directed by Mark Kitchell, (​husband of Occupy Forum’s own Ruthie Sakheim​)​, offers a deeper view of environmentalism as civilizational  change, bringing our industrial society into sustainable balance with nature.

 Time will be allotted for Q&A, discussion and announcements.
Donations to Occupy Forum to cover costs are encouraged; no one will be turned away.
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“SF looks into forming its own bank” by Emily Green (sfchronicle.com)

Supervisor Malia Cohen speaks ouside of City Hall in San Francisco. Cohen wants to create a task force to assess the feasibility of establishing a San Francisco-owned bank. Photo: Jeff Chiu, Associated Press

Photo: Jeff Chiu, Associated Press.  Supervisor Malia Cohen speaks ouside of City Hall in San Francisco. Cohen wants to create a task force to assess the feasibility of establishing a San Francisco-owned bank.

April 21, 2017

This time San Francisco wants to be second — second in the nation to have a publicly owned bank, that is. There’s only one right now: the Bank of North Dakota.

The reasons? The legalization of marijuana in California, the constant demand that the city divest from one bank or another for one political reason or another, and the fact that undocumented immigrants can’t get bank accounts.

“The time is now to begin addressing this, because people in San Francisco are at a point where they are no longer willing to accept the status quo and they are open to exploring other alternatives,” said Supervisor Malia Cohen, who wants to create a task force to assess the feasibility of establishing a San Francisco-owned bank.

Supervisor Sandra Fewer agreed: “Now is the time. Especially when we see the big banks are investing in bad actors that are not aligned with San Francisco values. This would give us control over our money.”

And San Francisco has company. The Oakland City Council’s Finance and Management Committee is set to look into setting up a bank where cannabis businesses could park their money.

The nation’s only public bank, the Bank of North Dakota, was created in 1919 in a populist wave when farmers there were unhappy with decisions being made by major banks. Its mission is to promote agriculture, commerce and industry in that state.

The idea of a bank owned by San Francisco has been bandied about for a few years. A 2011 report by the city’s budget and legislative analyst listed the potential benefits of a city-owned bank: creation of a new revenue stream without raising taxes, decreased borrowing costs, and increased support for small businesses and community development programs.

Another potential benefit: It would give San Francisco more control over how its money is spent — an issue in a city that regularly tries to divest from banks, companies, states and countries viewed as unaligned with its progressive values.

In recent years, supervisors have called for divesting from banks that helped finance the Dakota Access Pipeline; Wells Fargo Bank, because it opened 2.1 million unauthorized accounts; and companies producing fossil fuels, firearms and ammunition.

Most banks are incorporated with the federal government as a standard corporation, or C corporation, meaning their primary fiduciary responsibility is to maximize shareholder value. If San Francisco were to open a public bank, it could incorporate as a benefit corporation, or B corporation, meaning it could prioritize other goals.

Cohen said she hoped a city-owned bank could help undocumented immigrants, who are largely left out of the banking system because of federal laws aimed at preventing money laundering. Those laws mean bank customers must produce a driver’s license or other legal form of identification. As a result, unauthorized immigrants rely on check-cashing services, which charge high fees.

Joseph Lynyak III, an expert on regulatory reform who advises banks and financial institutions, said a public bank would run into the same problems of needing to check customer identification. Still, he said, he thought work-arounds could be found. “Theoretically you could do it,” he said.

Lynyak was less optimistic that a city-owned bank could open accounts for cannabis dispensaries, because marijuana is illegal under federal law. The federal government could charge the bank with “aiding and abetting violation of federal drug laws and also engaging in money laundering,” he said.

But Fiona Ma, a member of the California Board of Equalization, said she believed a public bank could do business with dispensaries in limited circumstances. She said dispensaries might be able to hold their money in a city-owned bank, take out cash only in San Francisco and use it to pay local taxes. Still, she acknowledged, there would be some risk.

“The question always is, can the federal government come and take the money if it’s not used for taxes and it’s just sitting there in an account?” Ma said.

Fow now, there are more questions than answers. Among the questions Cohen wants the task force to look into: how much initial capital the city would need to open the bank and where that money would come from, operating costs, scope of operations, how it would be insured, potential revenue streams and risks.

City Treasurer Jose Cisneros said he would consider the idea, but didn’t exactly endorse the concept.

“The treasurer takes his fiduciary responsibility seriously,” his spokesman, Amanda Fried, said in a statement. “The voters have elected him four times to keep the city’s money safe. He is reviewing this resolution carefully, and looks forward to working with the Board of Supervisors to better understand their policy goals regarding the creation of a municipal bank.”

Cohen said opening a bank would be tough, but thought it could be done.

“I think it’s realistic. It will be incredibly difficult, though.”

One thing’s for sure: It wouldn’t be called the Bank of San Francisco — there’s already a private bank with that name.

Emily Green is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: metro@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @emilytgreen

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“A BANK EVEN A SOCIALIST COULD LOVE” by DAVID DAYEN (occupy.com)

“Money is a utility that belongs to all of us,” says Walt McRee. McRee is a velvety-voiced former broadcaster now plotting an audacious challenge to the financial system. He’s leading a monthly conference call as chair of the Public Banking Institute (PBI), an educational and advocacy force formed seven years ago to break Wall Street’s stranglehold on state and municipal finance.

“This is one of the biggest eye-openers of my life,” says Rebecca Burke, a New Jersey activist on the call. “Once you see it, you can’t look back.”

This ragtag group—former teachers, small business owners, social workers— wants to charter state and local banks across the country. These banks would leverage tax revenue to make low-interest loans for local public works projects, small businesses, affordable housing and student loans, spurring economic growth while saving people—and the government—money.

At the heart of the public banking concept is a theory about the best way to put America’s abundance of wealth to use. Cities and states typically keep their cash reserves either in Wall Street banks or in low-risk investments. This money tends not to go very far. In California, for example, the Pooled Money Investment Account, an agglomeration of $69.5 billion in state and local revenues, has a modest monthly yield of around three-quarters of a percent.

When state or local governments fund large-scale projects not covered by taxes, they generally either borrow from the bond market at high interest rates or enter into a public-private partnership with investors, who often don’t have community needs at heart.

Wall Street banks have used shady financial instruments to extract billions from unsuspecting localities, helping devastate places likeJefferson County, Alabama. Making the wrong bet with debt, like the Kentucky county that built a jail but couldn’t fill it with prisoners, can cripple communities.

Even under the best conditions, municipal bonds—an enormous, $3.8 trillion market—can cost taxpayers. According to Ellen Brown, the intellectual godmother of the public banking movement, debt-based financing often accounts for around half the total cost of an infrastructure project. For example, the eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge cost $6.3 billion to build, but paying off the bonds will bring the price tag closer to $13 billion, according to a 2014 report from the California legislature.

Public banks reduce costs in two ways. First, they can offer lower interest rates and fees because they’re not for-profit businesses trying to maximize returns. Second, because the banks are publicly owned, any profit flows back to the city or state, virtually eliminating financing costs and providing governments with extra revenue at no cost to taxpayers.

“It enables local resources to be applied locally, instead of exporting them to Wall Street,” says Mike Krauss, a PBI member in Philadelphia. “It democratizes our money.”

Legislators, Brown says, commonly object that governments “don’t have the money to lend.” But this misunderstands how banks operate. “We’re not lending the revenues, just putting them in a bank.” That is, the deposits themselves—in this case tax revenues—are not what banks loan out. Instead, banks create new money by extending credit. Deposits simply balance a bank’s books. Public banks, then, expand the local money supply available for economic development. And while PBI has yet to successfully charter a bank, there’s an existing model in the unlikeliest of places: North Dakota.

During the Progressive Era, a political organization of prairie populists known as the Nonpartisan League took control of the state government. In 1919, they established the Bank of North Dakota. It has no branches, no ATMs, and one main depositor: the state, its sole owner. From that deposit base, BND makes loans for economic development, including a student loan program.

BND also partners with local private banks across the state on loans that would normally be too big for them to handle. These loans support infrastructure, agriculture and small businesses. Community banks have thrived in North Dakota as a result; there are more per capita than in any other state, and with higher lending totals. During the financial crisis, not a single North Dakota bank failed.

BND loans are far more affordable than those from private investors. BND’s Infrastructure Loan Fund, for example, finances projects at just two percent interest; municipal bonds can have rates roughly four times as high. And according to its 2015 annual report, the most recent available, BND had earned record profits for 12 straight years (reaching $130 million in 2015), during both the Great Recession and the state’s more recent downturn from the collapse in oil prices. A 2014 Wall Street Journal story described BND as more profitable than Goldman Sachs. Over the last decade, hundreds of millions of dollars in BND earnings have been transferred to the state (although the overall social impact is somewhat complicated by the bank’s role in sustaining the Bakken oil boom).

public banks, public banking, Public Banking Institute, Public Bank of Oakland, money democratization, municipal money control

THE LONG MARCH THROUGH THE LEGISLATURES

Brown founded the Public Banking Institute in 2010, after years of evangelizing in articles and books such as The Web of Debt: The Shocking Truth About Our Monetary System and How We Can Break Free. Since then, by Walt McRee’s estimate, around 50 affiliated groups have sprouted up in states, counties and cities from Arizona to New Jersey.

“I’ve been working against the system all my life,” says Susan Harman of Friends of the Public Bank of Oakland. “I think public banking is the most radical thing I’ve ever heard.” Harman, a former teacher and a onetime aide to New York City Mayor John Lindsay, helped get the Oakland City Council to pass a resolution last November directing the city to determine the scope and cost of a feasibility study for a public bank—a tiny yet promising first step.

A feasibility study completed by Santa Fe, N.M., in January 2016 found that a public bank could have a $24 million economic impact on the city in its first seven years. A resolution introduced last October would create a task force to help the city prepare to petition the state for a charter. “It’s the smallest municipality investigating public banking,” says Elaine Sullivan of Banking on New Mexico, who hopes the task force could complete its business plan by the end of the year. “We’re interrupting the status quo.”

In February 2016, the Philadelphia City Council unanimously voted to hold hearings discussing a public bank. Advocates are now working with the city treasurer to find funds to capitalize the bank.

PBI has faced a rougher path in state legislatures. In Washington, state Sen. Bob Hasegawa (D) has introduced a public banking bill for eight straight years. Despite numerous co-sponsors, the bill can’t get out of committee. Efforts in Arizona and Illinois have also gone nowhere. California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) vetoed a feasibility study bill in 2011, arguing the state banking committees could conduct the study; they never did.

One overwhelming force opposes public banking: Wall Street, which warns that public banks put taxpayer dollars at risk. “The bankers have the public so frightened that [public banking] will destroy the economy,” says David Spring of the Washington Public Bank Coalition. “When I talk to legislators, some are opposed to it because ‘it’s for communists and socialists.’ Like there are a lot of socialists in North Dakota!”

In Vermont the financial industry fought a proposed study of public banking, says Gwen Hallsmith, an activist and former city employee of Montpelier. “We don’t have branches of Bank of America or Wells Fargo in Vermont, but they have lobbyists here.” So Hallsmith got the study done herself, through the Gund Institute at the University of Vermont. It found that a state bank would boost gross domestic product 0.64 percent and create 2,500 jobs.

The state eventually passed a “10 percent” program, using 10 percent of its cash reserves to fund local loans, mostly for energy investments like weatherizing homes. Meanwhile, Hallsmith helped push individual towns to pass resolutions in favor of a state bank— around 20 have now done so. Hallsmith says her advocacy came at the expense of her job; the mayor of Montpelier, in whose office she worked, is a bank lobbyist. Hallsmith now coordinates a citizen’s commission for a Bank of Vermont.

Because of state resistance, PBI has encouraged its supporters to go local. And several issues have emerged to assist. For instance, environmental and indigenous activists have demanded that cities move money from the 17 banks that finance the Dakota Access Pipeline. But therein lies another dilemma: Who else can take the money? Community banks and credit unions lack the capacity to manage a city’s entire funds, and larger banks are better equipped to deal with the legal hurdles involved in handling public money. So divesting from one Wall Street bank could just lead to investing in another.

A public bank could solve this problem, either by accepting cities’ deposits or by extending letters of credit to community banks to bolster their ability to take funds. Lawmakers in Seattle have floated a city- or state-owned bank as the best alternative for reinvestment, and Oakland council member Rebecca Kaplan has connected divestment and public banking as well.

Another opportunity arises with marijuana legalization initiatives. Because cannabis remains illegal at the federal level, most private banks are wary of working with licensed pot shops, fearing legal repercussions. This means many of these shops subsist as all-cash businesses. “It’s seriously dangerous; people arrive in armored cars to City Hall to pay taxes with huge bags of money,” says Susan Harman. In Oakland and Santa Rosa, Calif., public banking advocates are partnering with cannabis sellers to offer public banks as an alternative, which would make the businesses safer while giving the banks another source of capital.

While Donald Trump hasn’t formally introduced a long-discussed infrastructure bill, his emphasis on fixing the nation’s crippling public works has also bolstered the case for public banking. Ellen Brown maintains the country could save a trillion dollars on infrastructure costs through public-bank financing. That’s preferable to Trump’s idea of giving tax breaks to public-private partnerships that want big returns.

public banks, public banking, Public Banking Institute, Public Bank of Oakland, money democratization, municipal money control

FROM THE GREAT PLAINS TO TRENTON

“All it’ll take is the first domino to fall,” says Shelley Browning, an activist from Santa Rosa. “Towns and cities will turn in this direction because there’s no other way to turn.” And PBI members think they’ve found an avatar in Phil Murphy, a Democrat and former Goldman Sachs executive leading the polls in New Jersey’s gubernatorial primary this year.

Murphy has made public banking a key part of his platform. “This money belongs to the people of New Jersey,” he said in an economic address last September. “It’s time to bring that money home, so it can build our future, not somebody else’s.”

Derek Roseman, a spokesman for Murphy, tells In These Times that Bank of America holds more than $1 billion in New Jersey deposits, but only made three small business loans in the entire state in 2015. Troubled state pensions could help capitalize a state-owned bank, and would earn more while paying lower fees.

Murphy’s primary opponent, John Wisniewski, chaired the Bernie Sanders campaign in the state, while Murphy raised money for Hillary Clinton. Some believe Murphy is simply using public banking to cover his Wall Street background—and on many issues, Wisniewski’s policy slate is more progressive. But Brown thinks Murphy’s past primed him to recognize public banking’s power: “It’s always the bankers who get it.”

The first new state-owned bank in a century, chartered in the shadow of Wall Street, could shift the landscape. What’s more, blue-state New Jersey and red-state North Dakota agreeing on the same solution would highlight public banking’s biggest asset: transpartisan populist support. “We have Tea Partiers and Occupiers in the same room liking public banking. What does that tell you?” asks PBI’s Mike Krauss.

“Regardless of declared conservative or progressive affiliations,” says state Sen. Hasegawa, “regular folk … almost unanimously grasp the concept.” He is working with Washington’s Tea Partybacked treasurer, Duane Davidson, to advance public banking. “I go to eastern Washington, … they get the whole issue about independence from Wall Street and corporate control.”

In fact, Krauss is himself a Republican. “The biggest thing going on in America, people decided we don’t have any control anymore,” he says. “Whether it’s Bernie’s people or Trump’s people, they’re articulating the same thing but differently. … They want control of their money—and it is their money.”

Originally published by In These Times

public banks, public banking, Public Banking Institute, Public Bank of Oakland, money democratization, municipal money control

– See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/bank-even-socialist-could-love?utm_source=Website+%27Join+Us%27&utm_campaign=28a60f94d6-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_77fe4a462d-28a60f94d6-73720709#sthash.xAGs9y9L.dpuf

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Berkeley Campus On Lockdown After Loose Pages From ‘Wall Street Journal’ Found On Park Bench (theonion.com)

BERKELEY, CA—Advising students to remain in their dormitories and classrooms until the situation was resolved, the University of California, Berkeley declared a campuswide lockdown Thursday after several loose pages from The Wall Street Journal were found on a park bench outside a school building. “At 11:15 this morning, several pages from two separate sections of today’s Wall Street Journal were discovered spread across a bench outside of Eshleman Hall in Lower Sproul Plaza,” read the urgent alert sent to all students and faculty, emphasizing that while campus security and local police had safely disposed of the pages, there was no way of knowing if others were strewn elsewhere on university grounds. “As of now, the perpetrator remains at large, so it is vital that you stay where you are until the all-clear is given. In the meantime, notify police immediately if you have any additional information at all regarding this incident.” At press time, a black-clad group of 50 students were throwing bottles at the bench while chanting, “No Nazis, No KKK, No Fascist U.S.A!”

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OccupySF ~ New Announcements from Friday 4/21 thru Tuesday 4/25 (from Adrienne Fong)

Updates: 

A) Local veterans worried that recent U.S. military actions could have devastating consequences

http://www.kusi.com/story/35162731/local-veterans-worried-that-recent-us-military-actions-could-have-devastating-consequences  

B) Oakland City Council Approves Measure Encouraging Sanctuary Workplaces

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/04/19/oakland-city-council-approves-sanctuary-workplaces-resolution/

C) Has San Francisco’s District Attorney Joined the Police in Covering Up Their Shooting of Amilcar Perez Lopez?

http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/04/20/has-san-franciscos-district-attorney-joined-the-police-in-covering-up-their-shooting-of-amilcar-perez-lopez/ ; (April 20)

D) A devious move to oust SF’s best Police Commission member

http://48hills.org/2017/04/19/oust-sfs-best-commissioner/  April 19, 2017

Send items for posting by 12 Noon on Wednesdays to: afong@jps.net

Occupy

~ San Francisco ~

Occupy San Francisco Bulletin Board

 http://www.occupysf.net

NEW ANNOUNCEMENTS

Friday, April 21 – Tuesday, April 25

Friday, April 21

1.  Friday, 12 Noon, Mothers On The March Against Police Murders

Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St.
SF

Weekly protest. All invited. Demand DA Gascon charge the officers with murder!

Sponsor: Justice 4 Mario Woods Coalition

Info: https://www.facebook.com/justice4mariowoodscoalition

2.  Friday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Amor for Alex Memorial Review and Discussion,

Bernal Heights
SF

we will meet at Bernal Heights to share love and community and to review the great success of the “Amor for Alex Memorial Concert” and to discuss the next steps to make our international quality monument a reality for generations to come!

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1899272183624384/

3.  Friday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Wopila tanka for the Water Protectors of the Two Spirit Nation

Sierra Club
2101 Webster, Ste. 1300
Oakland

Join us in thanking the Two Spirit Nation water protectors who camped for months on the front lines of sacred site desecration at Standing Rock. 

We will be joined by Hank Herrera (Ohlone/Lisjan), Candi Brings Plenty (Lakota), leader of the Two Spirit Nation camp, other water protectors from the Two Spirit Nation camp, and members of the intertribal indigenous community of Ohlone territories in the East Bay. 

Food provided

Donations to the Two Spirit water protectors’ Turtle Island speaking tour can be made to their Paypal account:paypal.me/TwoSpiritNation

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1895623794045925/

Saturday, April 22 

4.  Saturday, 9:00am – 12Noon, the “Divest from the Pipeline Creditors” walking tour

Gather at:

American Youth Hostel
312 Mason St.
SF

Cost: $15.00 to be contributed to Standing Rock Legal Defense Fund

Come along on a FREE walking tour surveying San Francisco social movement history and exploring the proposition that nearly all systemic oppression can be traced back to the privatization of access to land.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/18/18798568.php

5.  Saturday, 4/22, 9:00am – Sunday, 4/23, 4:00pm, SFT West Coast Conference 2017

Greenpeace Warehouse
955 – 7th Street
Oakland

Registration fee: $25.00 (covers food & training)

REGISTRATION: https://tinyurl.com/SFTWCC2017

Students for a Free Tibet (SFT) is hosting the 2017 West Coast Conference in the San Francisco Bay Area from April 22-23! 

Participants will have the opportunity to further engage with the Tibetan movement and other activists through trainings and discussions. Participants will gain campaign strategy, grassroots organizing, and public speaking skills alongside other valuable tools to insure effective action. 

China’s crackdown in Tibet is ever increasing and we must stand up, speak out, and take action!

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1293862470660405/

6.  Saturday, 10:00am – 6:00pm, Earth Day 2017 Festival (See items # 7 & 8   for March for Science )

Civic Center
San Francisco

Free

Earth Day SF 2017 and March For Science /Science Fair . 

This will be the most educational, impactful and festive Earth Day Celebration to date. The festival will feature entertainment, dynamic panel discussions and speakers at our ‘Eco Teach In’ section, organic celebrity chef showcase,organic and vegan food courts, wine and beer gardens, clean energy zone,cutting edge earth friendly products, an electric vehicle showcase, kids zone and More

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/197968994009926/

7.  Saturday, 10:30am, SF March For Science – REFUSE  FASCISM Contingent  (See #8  for schedule)

Gather at:

Foot of Market St.
SF

People all around the country are joining scientists to take a stand against the Right’s assault on science and proposed cuts to scientific research.

All are welcomed to join.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1949605128602810/

8.  Saturday, 11:00am – 6:00pm,  March For Science – San Francisco

Start: Justin Herman Plaza, 11:00AM
End: Civic Center Plaza

11:00am A rally with invited speakers will start the event at  in Justin Herman Plaza.           

12:30PM, (approximately) we will march down Market street to Civic Center Plaza, ending with a Fair to celebrate science. Events at Civic Center Plaza will conclude at 6pm.

If you would like to attend the March For Science – San Francisco and will need assistance, please contact us in advance atlogistics@marchforsciencesf.com

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1855242758068186/

9Saturday, 2:00pm – 8:00pm,  Fight Your Eviction Fest!

Gallery 2301
2301 Telegraph Ave.
Oakland

Wheelchair Accessible

Free all day.

2PM KNOW YOUR TENANTS’ RIGHTS:

How much can your landlord legally raise your rent? What constitutes an unlawful eviction? What costs is your landlord legally required to cover? Learn your rights as an Alameda County tenant, and learn about ongoing campaigns to win renters’ rights, in a workshop with Braz Shabrell of the East Bay Community Law Center. 

4PM SILKSCREENING WITH ZEPH FISH: Bring something you’d like to print on!

6PM DOC NIGHT: 

Oakland documentarian Ariel Appel will be presenting a series of short documentaries about East Bay displacement and the fight for housing justice that she created with the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project. She will also have further information about the work being done by AEMP and how to get involved.

*Suggested donation of $5-15 to Anti-Eviction Mapping Project starting at 6 PM. NOTAFLOF.

*Coffee and tea will be provided

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/256828488060484/

10. Saturday, 2:30pm – 3:30pm – NO -TASERS Committee Meeting

SF Main Library
30 Grove St., 4th Floor, Sycit Room
SF

Public meeting – all invited.

SF Police Commission is once again considering TASERS for SFPD. The SF Police Officers Assoc. is also pushing for them. The new SF Chief of Police is also for arming SFPD with TASERS. There is ample evidence that TASERS KILL!

Article: New SFPD chief of police tells union he wants “strategy”  to adopt controversial stun guns

  http://www.sfexaminer.com/news-sfpd-chief-tells-union-wants-strategy-adopt-controversial-stun-guns/

RSVP: Nick jpk@pobox.com

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/19/18798571.php

11. Saturday, 3:30pm – 5:30pm, Talking With Kids About Race: A Panel Discussion

SF Library

100 Larkin St.

SF

Free / registration: https://www.z2systems.com/np/clients/ourfamily/event.jsp?event=59340https://www.z2systems.com/np/clients/ourfamily/event.jsp?event=59340

Panel Discussion with Youth, Families, and Teachers.

 A diverse panel in frank conversations about protecting our children’s safety and raising them to be resilient and proud of their identities while also showing up for their friends. 

We will talk about race, gender, and power dynamics in bullying and daily life, with families of color and families with other marginalized identities at the center of the conversation.

 Families will also learn to identify and acknowledge their privileged identities and help children understand how to be more aware of privilege and share it for justice.

Childcare provided. Register online for childcare and translation.

http://bit.ly/ttkar_panel_registration

Sponsor: SURG – SF

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/197216314107353/

12. Saturday, 5:00pm – 7:00pm,  National Call To Action! Justice for Diallo Neal!

Oakland City Hall
1 Frank Ogawa Plaza
Oakland

Together We Stand and Open Circle – Families United For Justice is announcing a National Day of Action for Justice for Diallo Neal. We are calling on all families and coalitions to join us and the mother of Diallo Neal, Gilda Baker, as we rally for an investigation to take place.

Diallo Neal was killed in a motorcycle “accident” in October 2005 after a chase with California Highway Patrol. Five years passed before his mother, Gilda Baker, began to put together the pieces of her son’s death. Eyewitnesses came forward saying that a CHP motorbike had shoved Diallo Neal, causing the fatal accident. A private investigator’s report revealed a number of issues with an inconsistent police narrative. We believe that Diallo Neal’s death was a homicide and that an investigation needs to take place.

Sponsor: Open Circle – Families United for Justice

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1314084368674071/

13. Saturday, 7:00pm – 10:00pm, First They Came for the Homeless’ Speak-Out

The Luggage Store Gallery
1007 Market St.
SF

Suggested donation $3 – $5 no one turned away

Please join us in a California speaking tour of front line leaders in the movement to end homelessness in America. Proceeds from the Tour will benefit the People’s Tribune, in order to finance papers for homeless and other writers to distribute so they can tell their stories.

Mike Zint – SF/Berkeley – homeless leader from ‘OccupySF, founding member of ‘First they came for the homeless’ and the Poor Tour intentional tent community/action 
Bilal Mafundi Ali – SF – People’s Commission for Justice and the San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness 
Silvia Hernandez – Los Angeles – homeless organizer on LA’s Skid Row 
Gena Mercer – Merced – homeless organizer, Central Valley Journey for Justice
Robert Aguirre – San Jose – co-founder of the grassroots organization H.O.M.E.L.E.S.S.
Jack Hirschman will read his powerful poem ‘Home’, written for the National Union of the Homeless 

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/326621854410056/

14. Saturday, 8:30pm – 10:30pm, Native Nations: Inaate/Se-It Shines A Certain Way + Gomez-Pena+

Artist Television Access
992 Valencia St.
SF

In their break-out first feature, Ojibway filmmakers Adam (in person) and Zack Khalil fearlessly reclaim the Native narrative from the museums that would confine it to the past, instead weaving a formally and intellectually complex essay on contemporary Indian identity.

The kaleidoscopic experience mixes doc, narrative, and experimental modes, transcending linear colonized history to explore how tribal prophecy resonates through the generations in their Great Lakes region. Using personal interviews, animated drawings, performance, and provocative inter-cutting, the Khalil brothers’ debut makes a bold case for indigenous people to be their own storytellers.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/02/03/18796167.php

Sunday, April 23

15. Sunday, 10:00am – 5:00pm, Earth Day celebration!

UC Gill Tract Community Farm
1050 Marin Ave.
Albany

See FB site for schedule

Scheduled for kids activities also provided

Free lunch made with food gathered at Gill Tract

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/586274524898822/

16. Sunday, 12 Noon – 6:00pm, People’s Park Anniversary Number 48 !

People’s Park
2556 Haste St.
Berkeley

People’s Park 48th Anniversary! Music, Food, Speakers and the beauty of the one and only People’s Park.

Free concert groups info at: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/17/18798487.php

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1821038698158999/

17. Sunday, 12:30pm, Unitarian Universalist Forum: Deborah Kennedy “Nature Speaks Art & Poetry for the Earth

Unitarian Universalist Society
1187 Franklin St.
SF

An award winning artist, writer, poet, teacher, activist with exhibitions in the U.S. and Europe. Her book will be central to her presentation, which is a poetical realization of scientific theory and our mismatched relationship to the Natural World

Info: uusfforum@gmail.com

18. Sunday, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Film Screening: I was the Terrorist

UC Berkeley Campus
Burrows Hall, Room 20
Berkeley

Doors open 12:45pm

Free event – donations at the door appreciated

Seats are limited. Please RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/i-was-the-terrorist-film-screening-tickets-33059253116

EarthGathering and UC Berkeley Nikkei Student Union invite you to a new documentary screening of “I Was The Terrorist” with director and journalist Hanayo Oya from Okinawa. 

With the federal budget that calls for an unprecedented $54 billion increase in military spending. This movie calls on us to demand our government to not  support war – whether from the U.S or Japan – and its destructive consequences on the environment and lives of Okinawans.
English subtitles pr
ovided.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1677286445905879/

19. Sunday, 1:00pm – 4:00pm, SF United Against Trump – General Assembly

Redstone Building
2926 – 16th Street
SF

See agenda on FB site. – if you would like it sent to you contact: afong@jps.net

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/743966942450949/

20. Sunday, 3:00pm – 5:00pm, Bay Area Welcomes Dr. Maryse Narcisse

First Presbyterian Church of Oakland
2619 Broadway
Oakland

$10-25 No one turned away

DON’T LET HAITI BE FORGETTEN!

Public Transportation: BART to 19th St, then either walk or bus 8 blocks up Broadway to 27th

Join Haiti Action Committee to welcome Dr. Maryse Narcisse, the spokeswoman and presidential candidate of Fanmi Lavalas, the party of Haiti’s first democratically elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Music by Vukani Mawethu, Phavia Kujichagulia and Val Serrant. A benefit for the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund. http://www.haitiemergencyrelief.org/Haiti_Emergency_Relief_Fund/donate.html 

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1108940769234958/

21. Sunday, 4:00pm – 6:00pm, Earth Justice: Rooted in Love, Planted in Community

Oakstop
1721 Broadway
Oakland

Tickets: $10.00 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/thrive-east-bay-earth-justice-rooted-in-love-planted-in-community-tickets-33320103326

22. Sunday, 4/23 – Sat. 4/29, Shut Down Creech 2017: April 23-29Indian Springs, NV

Shut Down Creech 2017
http://shutdowncreech.blogspot.com/
Mass Mobilization to Stop Drone Wars! A Convergence For Peace in the Nevada Desert

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/354272504948358/

Monday, April 24 

23. Monday, 8:30am – 2:00pm, Court Support for Michael Brewster (check FB site for courtroom)

Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St.
SF

Michael Brewster SURVIVED a police assault. He tried to defend himself because he had no idea why they were assaulting him.

This took place in the SF Mission District at Foote and Mission. There were multiple witnesses, his familiy bravely tried to help him, even pulling officers off him and his mother stopped an officer from further beating Michael with his baton.

Now the DA has charged Michael with 3 Felony Counts. Of course they don’t want this to go to trial, so they are going to offer Michael a plea deal.Michael has decided to reject the deal and take this to court. Please join him on Monday, April 24th and let him know he has our support!

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1564476873593237/permalink/1578356222205302/

24. Monday, 1:30pm – 3:00pm, Say ‘NO’ to the Chop Shop Legislation

SF City  Hall, Room 250
1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Pl.
SF

There is more anti-homeless legislation at City Hall!  Legislation will be heard at the Land Use Committee.

This is an ordinance that would amend the Police Code to prohibit the taking apart or rebuilding of bikes, having bike parts, or selling bike parts in public spaces, and allows citations, impound fees, and the seizure of those parts. (See FB site for details of legislation)

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1687332008235927/

Tuesday, April 25

25. Tuesday, 5:30pm – 7:30pm, Save City College of SF General Assembly

CCSF
Ocean Campus MUB 260
Phelan Ave.
SF

To be discussed: 
* Land Grabs (CCSF property going to benefit private developers); 
*
The ongoing plan to downsize the college; 
* The proposal to arm the CCSF police. 
CCSF Board of Trustee member Tom Temprano will speak at 6 pm.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/19/18798606.php

26. Tuesday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Speak Out at the School Board : No Monster Shadow on Marshall ES

555 Franklin St.
SF

Robert Rosania/Maximus’s ten-story luxury Monster in the Mission would cast a shadow on the Marshall School playground during most of the day for the entire school year. It would also consist mostly of housing utterly unaffordable to our community and would rapidly accelerate displacement in the neighborhood. 

Let the SFUSD School Board and administration know that we need a community-planned, and community serving development at 16th and Mission, not a monster luxury project.

Sponsor: The Plaza 16 Coalition

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/205780636585281/

27. Tuesday, 6:30pm – 8:30pm, Accompaniment Training

First Unitarian Universalist Center
1187 Franklin St.
SF

Accompaniment Training: Learn to Walk with Our Brothers and Sisters Facing Deportation:
As fears of deportation for undocumented folks increase under the new administration, join with Faith in Action to learn how to walk with our brothers and sisares facing deportation. This training will explore how best we can support individuals, and how to garner these efforts toward broader impact through public campaigns. Led in large part by those who have been accompanied themselves, we will learn how to stand in deep solidar
ity. 

RSVP Requested. Questions? Email Julie@faithinactionba.org.

Sponsor: Faith in Action Bay Area

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/204508193386213/

28. Tuesday, 7:00pm – 10:00pm, Stop Urban Shield at Berkeley City Council

City Council Berkeley
2134 MLK Jr. Way
Berkeley

Berkeley City Council will be voting on whether on not to participate in Urban Shield activities or other collaborations with federal law enforcement that involve militarized policing. Stay tuned for more info and save the date to come out and testify!

Sponsor: Stop Urban Shield

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1845764385688714/

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Updates and New Announcements from Adrienne Fong

Updates:

A) Local veterans worried that recent U.S. military actions could have devastating consequences

http://www.kusi.com/story/35162731/local-veterans-worried-that-recent-us-military-actions-could-have-devastating-consequences

B) Oakland City Council Approves Measure Encouraging Sanctuary Workplaces

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/04/19/oakland-city-council-approves-sanctuary-workplaces-resolution/

C) Has San Francisco’s District Attorney Joined the Police in Covering Up Their Shooting of Amilcar Perez Lopez?

by BEN ROSENFELD  April 20, 2017

http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/04/20/has-san-franciscos-district-attorney-joined-the-police-in-covering-up-their-shooting-of-amilcar-perez-lopez/  (April 20)

D) A devious move to oust SF’s best Police Commission member

http://48hills.org/2017/04/19/oust-sfs-best-commissioner/  April 19, 2017

 

Send items for posting by 12 Noon on Wednesdays to: afong@jps.net

 Occupy

~ San Francisco ~

 Occupy San Francisco Bulletin Board

 http://www.occupysf.net

NEW ANNOUNCEMENTS

Friday, April 21 – Tuesday, April 25

 Friday, April 21

  1. Friday, 12 Noon, Mothers On The March Against Police Murders

Hall of Justice

850 Bryant St.

SF

Weekly protest. All invited. Demand DA Gascon charge the officers with murder!

Sponsor: Justice 4 Mario Woods Coalition

Info: https://www.facebook.com/justice4mariowoodscoalition

  1. Friday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Amor for Alex Memorial Review and Discussion,

 Bernal Heights

SF

We will meet at Bernal Heights to share love and community and to review the great success of the “Amor for Alex Memorial Concert” and to discuss the next steps to make our international quality monument a reality for generations to come!

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1899272183624384/

  1. Friday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Wopila tanka for the Water Protectors of the Two Spirit Nation

 Sierra Club

2101 Webster, Ste. 1300

Oakland

Join us in thanking the Two Spirit Nation water protectors who camped for months on the front lines of sacred site desecration at Standing Rock.

We will be joined by Hank Herrera (Ohlone/Lisjan), Candi Brings Plenty (Lakota), leader of the Two Spirit Nation camp, other water protectors from the Two Spirit Nation camp, and members of the intertribal indigenous community of Ohlone territories in the East Bay.

Food provided

Donations to the Two Spirit water protectors’ Turtle Island speaking tour can be made to their Paypal account: paypal.me/TwoSpiritNation.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1895623794045925/

Saturday, April 22

  1. Saturday, 9:00am – 12Noon, the “Divest from the Pipeline Creditors” walking tour

 Gather at:

American Youth Hostel

312 Mason St.

SF

Cost: $15.00 to be contributed to Standing Rock Legal Defense Fund

Come along on a FREE walking tour surveying San Francisco social movement history and exploring the proposition that nearly all systemic oppression can be traced back to the privatization of access to land.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/18/18798568.php

  1. Saturday, 4/22, 9:00amSunday, 4/23, 4:00pm, SFT West Coast Conference 2017

Greenpeace Warehouse

955 – 7th Street

Oakland

Registration fee: $25.00 (covers food & training)

REGISTRATION: https://tinyurl.com/SFTWCC2017

Students for a Free Tibet (SFT) is hosting the 2017 West Coast Conference in the San Francisco Bay Area from April 22-23! 

Participants will have the opportunity to further engage with the Tibetan movement and other activists through trainings and discussions. Participants will gain campaign strategy, grassroots organizing, and public speaking skills alongside other valuable tools to insure effective action. 

China’s crackdown in Tibet is ever increasing and we must stand up, speak out, and take action!

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1293862470660405/

  1. Saturday, 10:00am – 6:00pm, Earth Day 2017 Festival (See items # 7 & 8   for March for Science )

Civic Center

San Francisco

Free

Earth Day SF 2017 and March For Science /Science Fair . 

This will be the most educational, impactful and festive Earth Day Celebration to date. The festival will feature entertainment, dynamic panel discussions and speakers at our ‘Eco Teach In’ section, organic celebrity chef showcase,organic and vegan food courts, wine and beer gardens, clean energy zone,cutting edge earth friendly products, an electric vehicle showcase, kids zone and More

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/197968994009926/

  1. Saturday, 10:30am, SF March For Science – REFUSE  FASCISM Contingent  (See #8  for schedule)

Gather at:

Foot of Market St.

SF

People all around the country are joining scientists to take a stand against the Right’s assault on science and proposed cuts to scientific research.

All are welcomed to join.

 Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1949605128602810/

  1. Saturday, 11:00am – 6:00pm,  March For Science – San Francisco

 Start: Justin Herman Plaza, 11:00AM
End: Civic Center Plaza

11:00am A rally with invited speakers will start the event at  in Justin Herman Plaza.           

12:30PM, (approximately) we will march down Market street to Civic Center Plaza, ending with a Fair to celebrate science. Events at Civic Center Plaza will conclude at 6pm.

If you would like to attend the March For Science – San Francisco and will need assistance, please contact us in advance at logistics@marchforsciencesf.com

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1855242758068186/

            9Saturday, 2:00pm – 8:00pm,  Fight Your Eviction Fest!

Gallery 2301

2301 Telegraph Ave.

Oakland

Wheelchair Accessible

Free all day.

2PM    KNOW YOUR TENANTS’ RIGHTS:

How much can your landlord legally raise your rent? What constitutes an unlawful eviction? What costs is your landlord legally required to cover? Learn your rights as an Alameda County tenant, and learn about ongoing campaigns to win renters’ rights, in a workshop with Braz Shabrell of the East Bay Community Law Center.

4PM   SILKSCREENING WITH ZEPH FISH:

Bring something you’d like to   print on!

6PM   DOC NIGHT:

Oakland documentarian Ariel Appel will be presenting a series of short documentaries about East Bay displacement and the fight for housing justice that she created with the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project. She will also have further information about the work being done by AEMP and how to get involved.

*Suggested donation of $5-15 to Anti-Eviction Mapping Project starting at 6 PM. NOTAFLOF.

*Coffee and tea will be provided

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/256828488060484/

  1. Saturday, 2:30pm – 3:30pm – NO -TASERS Committee Meeting

 SF Main Library

30 Grove St., 4th Floor, Sycit Room

SF

Public meeting – all invited.

SF Police Commission is once again considering TASERS for SFPD. The SF Police Officers Assoc. is also pushing for them. The new SF Chief of Police is also for arming SFPD with TASERS. There is ample evidence that TASERS KILL!

Article: New SFPD chief of police tells union he wants “strategy”  to adopt controversial stun guns

  http://www.sfexaminer.com/news-sfpd-chief-tells-union-wants-strategy-adopt-controversial-stun-guns/

RSVP: Nick jpk@pobox.com

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/04/19/18798571.php

            11. Saturday, 3:30pm – 5:30pm,

Talking With Kids About Race: A Panel Discussion

SF Library100 Larkin St.SF Free / registration: https://www.z2systems.com/np/clients/ourfamily/event.jsp?event=59340https://www.z2systems.com/np/clients/ourfamily/event.jsp?event=59340

Panel Discussion with Youth, Families, and Teachers. A diverse panel in frank conversations about protecting our children’s safety and raising them to be resilient and proud of their identities while also showing up for their friends. We will talk about race, gender, and power dynamics in bullying and daily life, with families of color and families with other marginalized identities at the center of the conversation.

Families will also learn to identify and acknowledge their privileged identities and help children understand how to be more aware of privilege and share it for justice.

Childcare provided. Register online for childcare and translation.

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Changes at The Poor Tour (from Mike Zint)

Image may contain: 1 person, tree, child, outdoor and nature
Image may contain: 2 people, people sitting, tree, sky, outdoor and nature
Image may contain: one or more people, people sitting, tree, grass, table, outdoor and nature
First they came for the homeless 

April 19, 2017

Changes at The Poor Tour. Today, we called our first GA since beginning this occupation over 6 months ago. I’m moving on, and the community must continue. The rules are in place, and they are trying out the consensus based government.

What we have accomplished is big. It needs to continue helping people. This month, three will have moved on. Three new people can come in. And so it will go.

A responsibly run tent community is the fastest and cheapest option for helping the homeless. We have proven it.

Why won’t the city listen?

–Mike Zint

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OccupySF Announcements for Friday 4/21 (from Adrienne Fong)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Friday, April 21

  1. Friday, 4/21, 8:30am – Sunday, 4/23, 5:00pm, 8th Annual International Islamophobia Conference

UC Berkeley School of Law – Boalt Hall
215 Boalt Hall
Berkeley

RSVP: https://irdproject.com/islamophobiaconf/islamophobiaconf-rsvp/

Islamophobia is most commonly understood to be a problem that impacts adversely on Muslim minorities living in Western countries

The conference addresses questions of the relationship between liberalism (and neo-liberalism) and Islamophobia. We particularly will have presentations that respond to the following themes:

-What is the relation between the discourse of ‘take our country back’ and the post-Cold war liberal political order?
-What intellectual and political resources and possibilities now exist for imagining the West in contravention of Islamophobia?
-Is the presence of the non-white, culturally unassimilable, rights bearing subject a political problem for western liberalism?
-What is the relationship between neo-liberal economic policies and rise of Islamophobia?

Tentative Schedule  https://irdproject.com/islamophobiaconf/islamophobiaconf-schedule/

  1. Friday, 12Noon – 4:00pm, Earth Day Action for Environmental and Climate Justice

United States Government Environmental Protection Agency
75 Hawthorne St. (btw. 2nd & 3rd Sts. and Howard & Folsom)- nr. Montgomery BART
SF

Tell Trump and his Billionaire & Polluter Cronies:
– STOP Environmental Racism and Injustice!
– Protect our Air, Water, Climate, Health, and Communities, NOT Polluters!

Sponsor: California Environmental Justice Coalition

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/242890026154345/

  1. Friday, 5:00pm – 7:30pm, 3rd on Third: Earth Day

Bayview Opera House
4705 Third Street
SF

A free community celebration with attractions for the whole family.

Live Music by Audiopharmacy and Rock the Bike‘s human powered speaker system.

Make a FUN BUG and other arts activities hosted by Museum of Craft and Design.

Featuring outdoor play area where children can test their skills in penalty shootouts, free throws, and pitching.

Experience our delicious Super Food Smoothies blends for FREE!

Learn more about environmental justice and activism.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/102818216926197/

  1. Friday, 6:00pm – 7:00pm, Mission Night Walk

Meet at:

St. John’s Church
15th Street & Julian
SF

We care! Stop the violence!

Info: http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?u=1cffc40a58193b3d538400764&id=bdf7e2f129&e=%5BUNIQID

  1. Friday ,6:00pm – Saturday, 4/22, 9:00pm, Trans Life + Liberation Art Opening

Citizen Engagement Laboratory
1330 Broadway
Oakland

An amazing opening night of art, music, food and community, celebrating the power of trans and gender nonconforming people of color!

Sponsored by Peacock RebellionCultureStrikeForward Together andSins

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Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1301418099941614/

  1. Friday, 6:30pm, Sensible Cinema’s film for April: “Before the Flood”

Unitarian Universalist Center
1187 Franklin St.
SF

Free admission; donations appreciated

We celebrate Earth Day in April and this film is Leonardo DiCaprio’s version of a Climate Change documentary.  It’s a rare and carefully thought out photographic expose’ as he visits earthly sites that depict the mounting evidence and causes of Global Warning.  

Info: Melvin (mcs104@hotmail.com) or Larry (415-722-6480)

  1. Friday, 6:30pm – 9:30pm, East Bay Climate Action Expo

David Brower Center
2150 Allston Way
Berkeley

Film sold out

Please note that the Climate Action Expo is FREE but we recommend that you purchase a ticket in advance to secure your seat for the film

Leonardo DiCaprio’s acclaimed film, Before the Flood, will screen at 7pm in the Brower Center’s Goldman Theater. Before the Flood explores the topic of climate change and discovers what must be done to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/251300295330629/

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Berkeley Sanctioned Encampment Rules of Conduct (from Mike Zint)

The occupation rules and government. This is how we succeeded in getting this far. This is how you occupy.

Berkeley Sanctioned Encampment Rules of Conduct
· Every resident must agree to these rules.
· No (street) drugs and/or alcohol (prescription drugs are exempt)
· No rowdy behavior
· 9 PM – 9 AM noise curfew
· All personal gear must be kept in tents, except for bicycles (one bike per person).
· Clean up after yourself
· No outside guests within the perimeter
· Maintain a “Good Neighbor” policy
· Maintain [a spirit of? ] self-sufficiency and mutual aid
· Each new resident is subject to a three day probationary period, followed by an additional two week period.
· Breaking a rule constitutes a strike – three strikes and out (a minimum 30 day suspension or permanent expulsion)
· Internal governance is defined in a separate document (see below) – basically a modified consensus procedure is to be used

Encampment Self-Governance Procedures

Self rule with consensus.

On items for approval, a desired 100% consensus is sought, with a graduated scale.
· 70% minimum is required to approve an item, but it must be revisited monthly to revise and improve consensus percentage.
· At 80% approval, an item gets revisited every two months to revise and improve consensus percentage.
· At 90% approval, an item gets revisited every 6 months to revise and improve consensus.

· If 100% approval is reached, the only way to revisit is with 51% approval to revisit.

If an item goes from above 70% approval to below 70% approval, it is dropped as an item unless resubmitted. [it is no part of the rules or no longer a resolution of the camp?]

To submit, a proposal needs to be made with 10% community backing. To revisit an item earlier than scheduled requires 51% community support.

Items must be revised before being resubmitted.

Changes in the government can be made following these basic rules. Unpopular items can be revisited and lose consensus. As the village evolves, these guidelines will allow for the government and community guidelines to evolve

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