First They Came for the Homeless Response to the “Pathways Project To Address the Homeless Crisis in Berkeley” (from Mike Zint)

March 26, 2017

The mayor proposed a plan to deal with the homeless crisis (not homelessness crisis) that did not include any homeless input.

Here is the communities input. Please share to the city council and mayor. I am unable to do so from this page.

First They Came for the Homeless Response to the
“Pathways Project To Address
the Homeless Crisis in Berkeley.”

First They Came for the Homeless agrees that, in the absence of available, permanent supportive housing for Berkeley’s homeless, the concept of providing respite from the streets – a period of stability in a sheltered, if Spartan, environment, giving individuals a chance to get back on their feet – is something that we can support.

We disagree on some of the details, we have additional suggestions, and would also like to make a few comments about the long-term plan.

First things first, we suggest that this passage in the introduction be rephrased:

“…this crisis also impacts community enjoyment of streets, sidewalks, parks, commercial areas and neighborhoods, especially in locations with significant concentrations of homeless individuals.”

Would Berkeley be a better utopia if the homeless were equidistantly spaced from each other? Are the homeless, as a special class, not allowed to enjoy commercial areas? And are we not part of the community? We are not where you see us because we want to reduce the enjoyment level of those who have a place to call their own. Again, we remind those who will listen: we have nowhere to go.

Details.

The final proposal does not include any reference to how many people would be housed per unit, nor how people would be chosen to live together. This is a modification of the original concept, which suggested that eight to ten people might occupy what appeared to be a single, large room.

We strongly believe that meaningful stability and respite require privacy and the choice of those who one lives with in intimate quarters. Based on our experience, we do not believe that people will voluntarily move into a housing situation in which they cannot choose who they live with, or one with no privacy, or move into an environment where, in aggregate, the housing is too dense. Do not create space where it feels that people are being stored and processed rather than helped.

We are adamant that fencing around any such facilities is not acceptable: first, because it shuts the homeless off, away from the community, symbolically and psychologically; second, because we know, again from our experience, that most homeless on the streets will perceive a fenced-in area as an attempt to herd and manage people, rather than as security. We believe that while security is important
· the most important security comes from the community;
· those charged with security should be hired from the homeless community itself; and
· a guard shack is symbolically inappropriate – a welcome area is a much more reasonable structure and concept.

We are very concerned about the length of time suggested for respite. Again, our experience tells us that the time people need to recover, and just as importantly, the time it takes to deal with all the red tape various government entities make one go through to access support and benefits, is often significantly longer than the one to two month period being suggested for stays in the STAIR center. While we understand that there is a tradeoff between the number of people the STAIR center can try to help in a given span of time versus how long each one can stay, we strongly recommend a more flexible approach, both at the STAIR center and with the BRIDGE housing.

Finally, our most vehement objection is to the idea of coercing people into these facilities. We strongly suspect that the “intense outreach” the project speaks of, involving many weeks of interaction with homeless people still on the street, is overkill: it will not be necessary should the facilities be favorably viewed. If STAIRS is to be successful, people must want to come. They will want to come en masse if the first people invited – not forced – to take up residence there report that they are treated well and with respect. Insofar as there are a thousand or more homeless people in Berkeley and these facilities will be able to handle far less than that number, coercion should not be necessary and makes no sense – beyond being oppressive, if coercion is needed to attract people to the facilities they will fail.

Which brings us to the issue of releasing people back onto the streets.

Additional Suggestions.

We recognize the unfortunate reality that permanent supportive housing is in extremely short supply and that situation is not likely to be remedied in the near term. We urge you to create as much low-cost housing for homeless residents in the form of stackable, modular units, Tiny Homes, subsidized ADUs, units in proposed developments reserved for the lowest income and zero-income, and via similar concepts, as fast as can possibly be made to happen.

But if it comes to pass that people must be turned out, put back onto the streets as the project proposal discusses, we cannot imagine putting them back into the very situation they came out of, with the likely loss of much that has been gained via respite. To subject people again to police harassment and confiscation of possessions would be doubly cruel. Perhaps this could be prevented by giving those sent back to the streets from STAIRS and BRIDGE a “Do Not Harass This Person or Confiscate This Person’s Possessions – by Order of the Mayor” badge, but we think we have a better idea.

We have advocated ad naseum for sanctioned encampments. We continue to believe these are a far better approach for those who have no choice but the streets than bushes, benches and doorways. Now we have an existence proof that a quasi-sanctioned encampment of limited size, operating within the scope of rules we have proposed to you in the past, can work and is working. (For a more detailed account, with examples of people we have helped, please read Stability First: A Community Of Tents and Tables; Chairs, Coffee and Camaraderie. https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/22/18797620.php)

The site at HERE/THERE has existed for almost three months without incident. It has provided shelter, security, stability and privacy to some twenty-five people. Some of its denizens have “graduated” or are about to “graduate” – finding jobs and/or arranging to be reunited with family. Many people have asked to be part of our community but with its limited size we can only accept people as others leave.

If we continue to be stable, we will see more successes (and, to be sure, there will be inevitably be a few problems – we are not mental health professionals or drug therapists – we recognize that). We would be in even better shape, mentally, physically and psychologically, if we could have the simple amenities of a porta-potty or two (if you found yourself at the HERE sign at 3:00 AM and suddenly had to go to the bathroom, where would you go?) and trash pickup.

We suggest that similar sites set up at various locations in Berkeley – perhaps one per Council district? – could serve as destinations for people leaving STAIRS/BRIDGE. This would provide graduates with continued stability and a known location and as such would allow mental, social and red-tape-dealing assistance to continue for these individuals far more easily. The sites would also help stabilize the many other Berkeley homeless who would populate them, providing to them as well the significant benefits of sanctioned encampments we have enumerated in previous discussions.

We believe that some of us currently living at HERE/THERE have the experience now to aid in the creation of additional sites, and we are willing to help the City of Berkeley in this endeavor if you are willing to allow us to do so.

Long Term Measures

We applaud the goal of creating a thousand spaces for Berkeley’s thousand unhoused individuals. Indeed, if half of California’s cities achieved half that many units (in proportion to their population) there would be no more homelessness in California.

What we are concerned about is the vagueness of both the plan and the timeline. It touches on all the bases, but provides little direction to the staff who must develop it. E.g.

“The Plan will address long term housing opportunities and identify service needs and gaps, including but not limited to healthcare, mental health and substance abuse, and pathways to work.”

We think more concrete goals would be helpful, and we still believe in ‘housing first.’ Creating long term housing opportunities is therefore paramount, but creating a thousand units will be a daunting exercise if not broken out into smaller, achievable steps. Such a plan might look something like
· 2017 – Develop legislation that will open up pathways to additional affordable housing, traditional and non-traditional.
· 2018 – Create and populate 100 units, while acquiring real estate for further expansion.
· 2019 – Create and populate an additional 200 units.
· 2020 – Create and populate 300 units, based on the successes and failures of previous years.
· 2021 – Create and populate 400 units.

Thank you for your consideration, and for making the crisis of homelessness a priority for the City of Berkeley.

Berkeley: Toying with police accountability (sfbayview.com)

January 29, 2017

by Dave Welsh

It was the first time I’d ever attended a Police Review Commission meeting in Berkeley, a university town near San Francisco. Together with nine other community members, we went to express our opposition to three terrible policies of the city government and its police department:

  1. Repeated police raids on homeless encampments, forcing people out of their tents into the cold, rainy winter, causing several recent deaths from exposure.
  2. City participation in the Northern California Regional Intelligence Center and its domestic spying operation, coordinated nationally by the FBI. This was used locally to spy on Black Lives Matter demonstrations.
  3. City participation in the Urban Areas Security Initiative, aimed at militarizing – and possibly eventually federalizing – local police forces under the baton of the Department of Homeland Security.

The homeless tent city set up in late 2015 by First They Came for the Homeless in front of Old City Hall in Berkeley, called Liberty City, followed draconian new restrictions on homeless residents adopted by the Berkeley City Council. After a few days and nights, police busted up the camp. Since then, First They Came for the Homeless has established many tent camps for homeless people in Berkeley – all of them broken up by local police. Personal belongings of the camp residents are routinely confiscated by police.

Several homeless people testified to the brutality – and smugness – of BPD officers as they repeatedly broke up the neat and well-regulated tent encampments organized by First They Came for the Homeless, a direct-action and advocacy group – confiscating property belonging to homeless camp residents.

One notable feature of the meeting was the presence of Acting Police Chief Andrew Greenwood and three other grim-faced officers, at a special table. Any time the chief wanted to speak, he just started talking and the chair yielded to him, for as much time as the chief wanted. In contrast, we community members had two minutes each at the start of the meeting – under “public comment” – after which we were expected to shut up and listen.

As for the commission itself, a majority supported the police on each of the three important issues before it. I thought to myself: What if 50 or 100 community people came, took over the rigged meeting and let the people speak?

A flashback to the freedom struggle in South Africa

After the meeting, I went for a beer with a friend and described my first experience with Berkeley’s Police Review Commission. It reminded him of something from the history of the African National Congress, at a time when they were fighting to free South Africa from settler colonialism.

There was the famous reaction of ANC and South African Communist Party militant Govan Mbeki, after serving on the augustly-named Transkei Territorial Authorities General Council in the apartheid-era South Africa of 1941. The ANC described the council as “a government-inspired creation which had elected members, such as Govan, and nominated chiefs, which had very limited administrative powers in the Transkei.”

Govan Mbeki himself likened the Transkei council to “a toy telephone – you can say what you like but your words have no effect because the wires are not connected to any exchange.” Similarly, the toothless Bantustan “parliaments” set up by the settler regime were referred to contemptuously by ANC activists as “toy telephones” – giving the appearance but not the reality of participation in governance.

Berkeley has a proliferation of “commissions,” designed to allow community input and advise the city council on various policy matters. Sometimes the commissions can play a useful role, and the people will righteously make use of them to push for needed changes. Still and all, if Govan Mbeki were around today, I bet he’d put our Police Review Commission squarely in the “toy telephone” category.

Liberal Berkeley gets a tank

Recently, Berkeley emerged from an election with a new mayor and a new City Council majority identified as progressive. A few days after they were installed in office, the new City Council debated whether to purchase a bullet-proof armored personnel carrier for the BPD, a $205,000 vehicle of which Berkeley would have to put up $80,000, with Homeland Security funding the balance.

Some 20 people spoke against the purchase, including Veterans for Peace member Daniel Borgstrom, who exclaimed: “Call it what you want, it’s an urban assault vehicle. That’s a tank. And we don’t need a tank!” VFP member Gene Bernardi wondered why the city was collaborating in a DHS-sponsored police militarization program, especially in light of the recent national election.

Other residents deplored the use of military equipment against Indigenous water protectors at Standing Rock, N.D., and wondered if the new tank might be used against Black Lives Matter protesters in Berkeley.

In the end, the new city council decided that the armored vehicle was something the BPD really needed. Only one member voted against it.

Dave Welsh, a retired letter carrier and delegate to the San Francisco Labor Council, is an organizer with the Community-Labor Coalition to Save the People’s Post Office and writes on many issues. He can be reached at sub@sonic.net.

(Courtesy of Mike Zint)

OccupyForum on April 3 and April 10

Hey Everyone!
OccupyForum will not be meeting March 27th, but will continue on April 3rd (Steve Zeltzer, and Adriana Camerera and Luis Gongora at 474 Valencia), and on April 10th at SEIU (see below).
xox Ruthie

“Thirty Seconds to Midnight” premier film showings in Bay area with Producer Regis Tremblay

Hope you can join us for one of the  three Bay area showings of excellent new film Thirty Seconds to Midnight April 10 and 11. It is a powerful film about the danger of nuclear war and climate change and the struggle of people around the world to challenge these dangers. Please spread the word  to the larger community and hope to see you there. See the flyer attached.

Warm Greetings and Peace,
David Hartsough

​OccupyForum: April 10th at SEIU at 6:30 PM​
David Hartsough, author of WAGING PEACE: Global Adventures of a Lifelong Activist,
PM press 2014. Available through Peaceworkers for $20 at 721 Shrader St., San Francisco, CA 94117.
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world:
Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead

“Stability First: A Community Of Tents and Tables; Chairs, Coffee and Camaraderie” by Mike Zint & JP Massar

Indybay.org  March 22nd

Governments need to take a serious look at how we have succeeded – and how they could help us succeed better. They need to take stability seriously. They need to allow an environment where stability can exist. And that means cities need to change how they are doing things when housing simply does not exist or is unaffordable.

The body of a homeless woman was found Saturday near Berkeley High School. She appears to have died of exposure. – Jan 15th, 2017, Berkeleyside.

What does it take to get off the streets? Money? Affordable housing? Employment? Of course the answer is yes, but none of those things is the first step. The first step is stability. Stability that the housed take for granted.

A lack of stability means the homeless barely survive. Figuring out how to exist with no sense of safety and security and nowhere to go, worrying about the police yet having committed no crime, takes all that someone has. Sometimes it’s too much and a short note appears in a local paper.

In October, 2016, First They Came for the Homeless (FTCftH), a political movement of the dispossessed in Berkeley, CA, tried to bring stability to their lives while at the same time calling attention to the plight of the homeless. Defying the status quo that forced them to sleep unsheltered and alone, they set up a community: tents and tables; chairs, coffee and camaraderie.  A community of the homeless, with support from housed friends. Needless to say all hell broke loose.

For months the City and its police chased them around Berkeley, and every raid First They Came for the Homeless endured – all fifteen of them – resulted in chaos. Not only by having gear taken, but by losing a sense of place. Every raid resulted in decreased stability and further unknowns: Where do I go next? How do I replace what I need? When will I get settled again?

Still, the community endured. Despite those fifteen raids, theft of critical gear and medicine, and constantly being relocated, our core held. We helped two of us with work. We sheltered and fed several dozen others. With a budget of $0.

On January 10th, 2017, the raids stopped.  First They Came for the Homeless denizens have been stable for more than two months now, and that stability has translated into even greater good.  Three examples (names changed):

Andre. Andre had been on the streets of Berkeley for months before joining FTCftH in October.  Finding people that accepted him and a community to support him, his lot improved, but he still needed stability – he needed a place his friends could find him, he needed a reliable mail drop. Once the raids ended, Andre was able to settle down, calm him mind, pull together the pieces of his life, get his documentation in order, contact his family, and arrange for them to accept him and his new pup.  In a few weeks Andre and his dog will have a new life on the other side of the Atlantic.  Without that stability, without a respite from the constant anxiety of nowhere to be, he might have wandered Berkeley’s streets for years.

Rita. Rita had been the victim of domestic violence. For one reason or another, she was unable to be placed in a shelter.  Unable to go home, with little money saved of her own, despite having a full-time job she was out on the Berkeley streets. Fortunately someone from FTCftH knew Rita, and invited her to be safe in their now-stable community. Rita’s been with FTCftH for a month, protected from what might have happened to her on the streets. She’s stable. She’s saving money and looks forward to soon going to Oregon to see her family and perhaps begin life anew there.

Mother and Son. A mother and her son, a drug user, had been on the streets of Berkeley for a long time, constantly harassed by police, their possessions continually at risk, unable to have more than a few days of peace at a time.  When FTCftH took them in in February on condition of no drug use, it changed their lives. They were given clothes, amenities and a secure place to sleep. The man was able to get and hold down a job. The woman is now contributing to the community.  Will their condition continue to improve? We don’t know, but without the promise of a stable community they never would have “come in from the cold” in the first place. With the anchor the community provides, they now have a chance.

That’s the kind of need that’s out there. That’s the challenge.  And while no one solution, no one path out of homelessness, works for everyone, these examples illustrate a way for some from the nadir of the streets upward. We have demonstrated the importance of stability. We have had our pilot – our proof of concept.

Governments needs to take a serious look at how we have succeeded – and how they could help us succeed better. They need to take stability seriously. They need to allow an environment where stability can exist. And that means cities need to change how they are doing things when housing simply does not exist or is unaffordable:

Step 1 is to allow the homeless tents in a sanctioned campground. A tent solves almost every issue immediately. Shelter, storage, safety, privacy, personal space, community and stability. Cost is minimal.

Step 2 is to allow tiny homes, container homes, cabins, or other housing ideas that are outside the box, inexpensive and mass-producible.

Step 3 is true affordable housing.

Why is it so hard to understand that?

People say housing is a right. We strongly disagree with that. Housing is a necessity! Without housing, you die from exposure. Just like food and water is necessary to live, so is shelter. Denial of shelter is as serious as denial of food and water. That is as true as it gets!

Berkeley and other California cities pride themselves on being sanctuary cities. But they neglect the economic refugees that sleep outside every night. They are everywhere, suffering. At the very least mitigate that suffering by allowing us the stability to shelter ourselves.

Mike Zint is a member of First They Came for the Homeless. JP Massar is a housed Berkeley activist, fighting against the senselessness of homelessness.  

New Announcements ~ Thursday 3/23 thru Tuesday 3/28 (from Adrienne Fong)

Updates:

          Berkeley is the first city to divest from border wall companies!

          Judge Derrick Kahala Watson of Hawaii, halted the Trump administrations new ban on Muslims

          Ms. Iris Canada– as of last week  remains hospitalized

          On Tuesday, the anniversary of Alex Nieto’s murder by SFPD, his temporary memorial was severely vandalized. If you would like to drop by there to bring some flowers – the family would welcome the support.

          On Wednesday, 3 people were picked up by ICE in the Tenderloin neighborhood in SF

Items #20 and #29, you must register in advance

Items #5 and #13 are related regarding Reps. Pelosi & Speier Town Hall

Send items for posting by 12 Noon on Wednesday to: afong@jps.net

Announcements

Thursday, March 23 – Tuesday, March 28

Thursday, March 23

1. Thursday, 11:30am – 2:00pm, Palestine Solidarity Week  – Day 3: Mock Checkpoint

UC Berkeley, Sather Gate
Sproul Plaza
Berkeley

Come out to support if you can. This week U.C. students have been met with strong opposition to the Palestine Solidarity Week on campus, stronger than in previous years. It is expected that today’s actions will be met with more opposition.

Today, students will be putting up a mock-apartheid wall and conducting a mock checkpoint expressed through street theater, in effort to display and express the reality of the oppression and occupation that Palestinians suffer.

You are invited to participate in the street theater or to stand in solidarity.

Israel has constructed “hundreds of checkpoints and other roadblocks on Palestinian land, which restrict Palestinian travel between, and sometimes, within, their cities and towns.
Many checkpoints are manned by heavily-armed Israeli soldiers and sometimes guarded with tanks. Others are made up of gates, which are locked when soldiers are not on duty. In addition there are hundreds of dirt or concrete roadblocks, which prevent the passage of all vehicles – family cars and ambulances
.

Sponsor: Students for Justice in Palestine and Bears for Palestine

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/276076972829627/ 

Friday, March 24

2. Friday, 9:00am – 11:00am, Court Support for Dejuan Hall-brutally beaten by Vallejo police

Fairfield Superior Court, Dept. 9
600 Union Avenue
Fairfield

Dejuan Hall was brutally beaten by Vallejo police officer Spencer Muniz-Bottomley on 3/10/2017, then charged with battery on police officer. He is currently held in Solano County jail.

The beating was captured on video: https://www.facebook.com/antionette.saddler/posts/1338405206216750?pnref=story

Host: APTP

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1965345797027099/ 

3. Friday, 9:00am – 3:00pm, Black Women Lead: Redefining Community, Empowerment & Activism

WestBay Conference Center
1290 Fillmore St.
SF

Cost: $50.00

Within a culturally affirming environment and honoring the unique history of African American women, the San Francisco Black Infant Health Program (BIH)  presents its 22nd annual Afrocentric Family and Life .

This year’s conference is not only designed for young black mothers, but also for the full spectrum of social service practitioners, providers and community leaders who support black families and their sustainability.

Conference Keynote Speakers: 
* Dr. Renee Branch Canady, CEO Michigan Public Health Institute 
* Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, author, “How Exceptional Black Women Lead,” Washington DC 
* Tanya Fields, Community Activist, Bronx, New York. 
 

Info: http://www.sfblackinfanthealth.org/

Indybay: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/04/18797029.php

4. Friday, 12 Noon, Mothers On The March Against Police Murders

Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St.
SF

Weekly protest. All invited. Demand DA Gascon charge the officers with murder!

Sponsor: Justice 4 Mario Woods Coalition

Info: https://www.facebook.com/justice4mariowoodscoalition/

5. Friday, 5:30pm, Campaign for HR 676 at Reps. Pelosi & Speier Town Hall  – Pre-Briefing Meeting

Muddy’s Coffee Shop
Valencia & 24th St.
SF

Reps. Pelosi & Speier will be holding a Town Hall meeting in SF on Saturday, March 25th.(See item # 13)

Event has reached capacity but you are encouraged to go anyway!

The Single Payer advocates will be meeting on Friday regarding the town hall.

Help is needed on  Saturday at the town hall.  We think the best way to defend healthcare is to ask her to become a cosponsor of HR 676, the Expanded and Improved Medicare for All Act. 

Info: Contact Don Bechler at 415-810-5826

6. Friday, 6:00pm – Michael Moore’s film “ Where To Invade Next”

Pacifica, Sharp Park Library
104 Hilton Way
Pacifica

Doors open 6:00pm; Film starts at 6:30pm

A free screening with a brief discussion following the film. Light refreshments provided

RSVP: deliaforpeace39@gmail.com  or cderby37@gmail.com

Sponsor: The Pacifica Peace People Acting Locally for Peace Globally

7. Friday, 6:30pm – 8:30pm, Sanctuary for a Moral Economy (FAME Speaker Series 2)

Oakland Peace Center
111 Fairmount Ave.
Oakland

FAME (Faith Alliance for a Moral Economy) Asks: What does solidarity look like? What is a moral economy?
This is a 4-part series, with a panel discussion happening at the Oakland Peace Center each month between February and May 2017. 
This is PART TWO, SANCTUARY for a Moral Economy. 

Panelist 1: Rev. Dr. James McDonald, President, San Francisco Theological Seminary
Panelist 2: Gerald Lenoir, Former executive director of Black Alliance for Just Immigration
Panelist 3: Ameena Jandali, Islamic Networks Group

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/189538158194167/

8. Friday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Answer Coalition Forum– New Korean War?

2969 Mission St.
SF

Recent actions and statements by the Trump administration and the Pentagon have raised the danger of a new war on the Korean Peninsula. At the same time as top U.S. officials are declaring that “no options are off the table,” massive “war games” are taking place very close to North Korea, and a new U.S. missile system is being deployed in South Korea, dramatically raising the threat of a new conflict. 

Join us for presentations and discussion of building the movement to resist a new war.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/413403889013146/  & https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/20/18797572.php

Saturday, March 25

9. Saturday, 8:30am – 5:30pm, California Environmental Justice Coalition  – Bay Area Nor/Cal Regional Conference

Local 2 Union Hall
209 Golden Gate Ave.
SF

Agenda:file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Administrator/My%20Documents/Downloads/CEJC%20Bay%20Area%20Flyer%20(2).pdf

To Register / Info: cejcoalition.org or (209) 589-9277 

10. Saturday, 12Noon – 1:00pm, SURJ SF – Human Billboard

Intersection of Octavia & Fell Streets
San Francisco

Join us at Octavia and Fell Streets, rain or shine, to call attention to racial injustice and demonstrate solidarity. 

Throughout the Bay Area and nationally, folks have been holding weekly gatherings on prominent street corners and freeway overpasses, holding signs and making visible our support for the Movement for Black Lives and communities targeted by Trump. Bring a sign.

Here are some Sample Sign Messages:

Will you show up for racial justice?
Black Lives Matter!
No Deportations! No Border Walls!
End displacement of Black and Brown communities!
Solidarity with Undocumented Migrants! 
Solidarity with Queer and Trans People of Color!
We Support Black Womxn! 
We Support Our Muslim Neighbors!
Will you fight against Islamophobia?

Sponsor: SURG (Showing Up For Racial Justice)

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/574079482791746/

11. Saturday, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Anti gentrification town hall – Save Black and refugee homes

New Liberation Presbyterian Church
1100 Divisadero St.
SF

In 1964 Midtown was created as a sanctuary for victims of Civic Redevelopment, a pledge by the city to right the wrongs suffered by African-American community of the Fillmore, a promise of economic empowerment and future homeownership. As the decades rolled by and the working class folks paid off property mortgage, refugees and immigrants from all over the world started calling Midtown their home, adding to the tightly-knit multicolored Midtown family. Unfortunately, their collective dreams were shattered when the city unilaterally broke off a lease with a tenant-led non-profit, and awarded it to a developer. Ownership promises reaffirmed in Board of Supervisors Resolution 325-07 were thrown out, rents were hiked 100% across the board, plans were created to demolish Midtown as we know it.

As our sanctuary city is under attack from the Trump government, so are 139 Midtown families that are in danger of displacement. Since 2015 tenants led the largest rent strike in San Francisco history, actively organized against the city and the developer, and are now calling for support in keeping Midtown a sanctuary for all.

Free & Kid Friendly

Sponsor: Save Midtown

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/263724290735026/

12. Saturday, 1:00pm – 4:00pm, The Ecological Crisis: Taking Responsibility and Cultivating Hope

Hillside Club
2286 Cedar St.
Berkeley

Sliding scale $50 – $100

Joint venture between The Psychotherapy Institute and The Sanville Institute, this will be a multi-disciplinary conversation about the psychological causes and effects of the ecological crisis. Event includes a reading of a screenplay written and performed by Naomi Newman, a paper presented by psychotherapist Terri Rubinstein on understanding and healing alienation from oneself, from others and from the natural world and a talk and Q&A with eco-philosopher Joanna Macy.

Sponsor: The Psychotherapy Institute

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/02/03/18796173.php

13.  Saturday, 2:00pm – 3:30pm, Town Hall Meeting with Reps. Nancy Pelosi and Jackie Speier (Event reached capacity) See Item#5.

Balboa High School Auditorium
1000 Cayuga Ave.
(enter auditorium on corner of Onondaga & Otesgo)
SF

Space is limited, and registration is required. Doors open at 1:15 p.m

Reps. Pelosi and Speier will discuss their work in Washington, D.C. and Democratic efforts to resist President Trump and Congressional Republicans’ agenda to pass TrumpCare and push millions off their health coverage, to embolden polluters by dismantling environmental protections, to instill fear in immigrant communities, and to enact an immoral budget that fails to meet the needs of the American people.

Public transportation is strongly encouraged. Balboa High School is located two blocks from the Balboa BART Station, and the following Muni lines are within two blocks of the school: street cars M, K & J; and bus routes 29, 43, 49, 54 & 8.

Info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/town-hall-meeting-with-reps-nancy-pelosi-jackie-speier-registration-33032042729?ref=enivtefor001&invite=MTE3MTM5MjQvam9jZWx5bnlvd0BiZXJrZWxleS5lZHUvMA%3D%3D&utm_source=eb_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=inviteformalv2&ref=enivtefor001&utm_term=attend 

14. Saturday, 2:00pm – 9:00pm Sin Naciones, Sin Fronteras

Accion Latina
2958 24th St.
SF

This event will be a space for conversation among immigrant communities and allies about the political issues we are facing today. It will provide an opportunity to organize our struggles. It is also a benefit for the May 1st march for immigrant rights.

Free

Sponsor: IntegrAte San Francisco

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1869641343321793/

15. Saturday, 3:00pm – 7:00pm, Launch Party to Liberate 23rd Ave Community Building

Oakland SOL – Sustaining Ourselves Locally
1236 23rd Ave.
Oakland

SUPPORT TENANTS TO LIBERATE 23rd AVE COMMUNITY BUILDING!

About the Campaign: 
A long-time, low-rent community building in East Oakland could become a giant warehouse for big tech–or stay an affordable, people of color -led social justice center, with your help! 

Our landlord is selling the building and unless we raise the cash to buy it, the vibrant, tight-knit community members and community resources living in our historic building at 23rd and International could be displaced.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/842438522564062/

16. Saturday, 4:00pm – 8:00pm, Fundraiser to Defeat the Trump Program

Doc’s Clock
2575 Mission St.
SF

Drinks, Music, Raffle

Fundraiser for upcoming ANSWER actions against the Trump program. ANSWER is working on organizing for the April 21 Climate Action on Earth Day and for the May 1 Day Without an Immigrant/Stop the Deportations protests

All funds raised will go towards printing costs for flyers, posters, signs, and for banner materials.

Sponsor: ANSWER

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/02/22/18796712.php  or call (415) 821-6545

17. Saturday, 4:30pm – 6:30pm, The Prison in Twelve Landscapes at USF Human Rights Film Fest

Presentation Theater
2350 Turk Blvd
SF

More people are imprisoned in the United States at this moment than in any other time or place in history, yet the prison itself has never felt further away or more out of sight.

film has been awarded Best Canadian Documentary and Honorable Mention at Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Film Festival 2016; Best Documentary and Alliance of Women Film Journalists EDA Award at DOXA Documentary Film Festival 2016.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1788168144839342/

18. Saturday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Sanctuary City: With Liberty and Justice for Some

San Francisco Arts Commission Galleries, suite 126
401 Van Ness Ave.
SF

Exhibition Dates: March 25 – April 8, 2017
Exhibition Location: SFAC Main Gallery

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 25, 6 – 9 p.m.
Free and open to the public

 The first installment of Sanctuary City, a yearlong exhibition and public program series that delves into topics related to San Francisco’s immigration policies, immigrant and refugee populations, and the history of our Sanctuary City status.

This exhibition features over 125 portraits of immigrants to the United States by 100 artists from Los Angeles and the Bay Area. Conceived in response to the presidential election in November, this show is a statement in response to the current administrations’ new executive order that blocks citizens from six Muslim-majority countries (Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen) from getting visas for 90 days, and reinstates a temporary blanket ban refusing admission to all refugees for 120 days.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1151120071678174/

Sunday, March 26

19. Sunday, 11:30am – 2:00pm, Reclaiming the History of the Russian Revolution

Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library
6501 Telegraph
Oakland

Speaker: Grover Furr

The Russian Revolution proved that workers could begin to build a new society. The many lies about Stalin prevent us from critically evaluating this. Mr. Furr will discuss his new book Yezhov vs Stalin, and other anticommunist lies about the Stalin period

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/13/18797370.php

20. Sunday, 12Noon – 2:00pm, Solidarity Training: Migra Watch Hotline (Must register)

East Bay Community Space
507 – 55th Street
Oakland

Please register here: http://bit.ly/2muAGBH

By attending a Solidarity Training you will receive training to volunteer your time to document and monitor ICE officials during raids in real-time. The Solidarity Training will cover:
Overview of ICE raids, tactics and strategies
Operation of Migra Watch hotline
Documentation
Rights & Risks of legal observers
Accompaniment overview

The goal is to equip you with the tools and information for you to register with ILM as a legal observer and be ready to respond to ICE raid alerts

Migra Watch is a program of the Immigrant Liberation Movement (ILM), which was created by the California Immigrant Youth Justice Alliance, East Bay Immigrant Youth Coalition, Faith in Action Bay Area/PICO California, and Pangea Legal Services in the Fall of 2016. 

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1319072364798184/

21. Sunday, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Presentation:  When ICE Agent Calls: Defending Immigrants in the Trump era

New Valencia Hall
747 Polk St.
SF

Hear Nikki Taylor, of the queer feminist activist group, The Degenderettes, as she presents information on immigrant rights, and what to do in the event of encounters with ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) or the border patrol. Discuss political strategies for defending immigrants and all others targeted by the right-wing Washington administration.

Sponsor: Freedom Socialist Party

Info: Telephone: 415-864-1278   Email: baFSP@earthlink.net

22. Sunday, 1:00pm – 5:00pm, SF United Against Trump – General Assembly

Redstone Building
2926 – 16th Street (nr. 16th Street BART)
SF

San Francisco United Against Trump will hold bi-weekly General Assemblies in order to discuss strategy and develop plans for resisting the discriminatory and destructive policies of the Trump Administration. In addition to discussing strategy and building political actions, we hope to faciltiate debates regarding long-term goals, political orientation, tactics, and internal/organizational issues. 

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/390956274594022/  orhttps://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/18/18797523.php

23. Sunday, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Rapid Response Legal Training

60 Wellington Avenue
Daly City

Join a team of legal observers, moral witnesses and supporters of families affected by immigration enforcement!

If you decide to join Rapid Response team:
– You will be trained by a legal team to become a legal observer and moral witness during ICE operations, at workplaces or homes
Be part of the team of “first responders” at the site of an ICE operation and connect affected families with the legal and social resources available to them in San Mateo County

Or

 if you don’t want to be a “first responder”, you can join the Accompaniment Team and play a supporting role in assisting families who are affected by raids—they may need rides to appointments, food, help connecting to services, etc

This network, including a hotline, is organized by: Faith In Action Bay Area, Pangea Legal Services, and the Archdiocese of San Francisco

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1662900764006927/

24. Sunday, 2:00pm – 3:00pm, Occupy Oakland Community Feed

Oscar Grant Plaza
14th & Broadway
Oakland

Attendees of Occupy Oakland GA meet the last Sunday of each month to share food with one another and the community.  GA begins at 3:00pm.

If it rains meeting will be at Omni Collective – basement, 4799 Shattuck Ave., Oakland.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/20/18797573.php

25. Sunday, 3:00pm – 4:30pm, Action SF General Meeting – Open to All

Noe Valley Public Library
451 Jersey St. (nr. Castro)
SF

Learn about how a new, small, friendly group is offering people a chance to help push back against the Trump/Republican agenda. Participate as much as you like via our teams focused on using Media, Economic, Legal, and Solidarity actions

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1720972498194724/   or https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/18/18797522.php

26. Sunday, 3:00pm – 5:00pm, The Democrats Are Part of the Problem: Why We Must Overthrow Capitalism

Workers World Party
1305 Franklin St. #411
Oakland

Wheelchair Accessible

In the midst of the vital and necessary resistance to all of Trump’s horrific policies against immigrants, Muslims, refugees, transgender people, and women… In the midst of fighting back against white supremacy, racism, LGBTQI bigotry, sexism and war… It’s important to step back and ask the questions related to how we got here. We can’t chart a way forward without looking back to examine the role of the Democrats in this downward spiral. 

Come hear about why the Democrats are part of the problem in the first place, and why the overthrow of capitalism is the only answer.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1339927649378295  or https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/19/18797542.php

27. Sunday, 4:00pm – 6:00pm, Thrive East Bay l Revolution From Within

First Congregational Church Oakland
2501 Harrison St.
Oakland

Guest Speaker: Ericka Huggins

An educator, former Black Panther Party leader and political prisoner, human rights activist, ally, and poet. Her life and work is a living link between the Civil Rights movement, the Black Panther Party, and modern day movements like Black Lives Matter.

 a special Spring Celebration on Sunday, March 26th as we explore the theme Revolution From Within with renown activist and educator Ericka Huggins, spoken word artist Eli Marienthal, and the soul-stirring Thrive East Bay Choir. As we navigate the next great wave of change, how can we transform ourselves and bring forth a social revolution that includes and uplifts us all

Tickets: 0 -$20: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/thrive-east-bay-revolution-from-within-tickets-32550831413?aff=efbeventtix

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1883150171929705/

28. Sunday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Toby Blome of CODEPINK Speaks About Drone Warfare

Unitarian Universalist of San Mateo
300 E. Santa Inez
San Mateo

Wheelchair Accessible

Speaker: Toby Blome

“Trump’s Inheritance: U.S. Drone Warfare – a Critical and Brutal Tool for U.S. Global Domination, and the Reasons We Must Resist It”

In addition to giving an overview of drone warfare, Toby will also discuss the 3rd annual national mobilization known as “Shut Down Creech”, a week-long resistance action at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada this coming April 23 – 29. Creech is where the CIA uses the U.S. Air Force to spy on the world and kill people at their will.

Toby’s work has focused on resistance to U.S. global militarism and drone killing, and since 2009 has included extended and ongoing protests at U.S. drone military bases in CA and NV. In 2012 she participated in the CODEPINK Peace Delegation to Pakistan, and met directly with family members of victims of drone warfare.

Sponsor: San Mateo Peace Action

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/02/21/18796703.php

Monday, March 27

29. Monday, 6:30pm – 8:30pm, Street Medic, Training Course (need to RSVP)

UCSF
Parnassus Campus, Nursing Building, Room N517
SF

Do No Harm Coalition will be hosting an Oakland Street Medic’s training for medical professionals and students who wish to be trained in decontamination and aid for large direct actions. 

This two hour training presumes each person has rudimentary first aid/ BLM training and will not go over those basics (this is not required, but will not be explained). We will need each person to bring a sports cap, squirt water bottle purchased new because we will be squirting each other in the face and eyes to practice decontamination. If you wish to receive this training, please state your interest and we can connect you with Amanda Bloom from Oakland Street Medics.

Please RSVPhttps://goo.gl/forms/DqG9RlldWtBETgB73

(Space is limited)

30. Monday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Impeach Trump Now! – Panel discussion

Center for Faith and Justice
1305 University Ave.
Berkeley

Participants: 
Jovanka Beckles, Richmond City Councilmember 
John Bonifaz, President, Free Speech for People 

Ben Clements, Board Chair, Free Speech for People 
Eva Paterson, Bay Area Civil Rights Attorney and Activist 
Norman Solomon, Coordinator, RootsAction 
Kris Welch, KPFA: emcee 

Prominent civil rights attorneys and civic leaders will unravel the issues and politics surrounding the Trump presidency in this panel discussion.

Bay Area city councils in Richmond and Alameda were the first in the U.S. to pass resolutions calling on Congress to begin impeachment proceedings.

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/22/18797626.php

31. Monday, 7:30pm – 9:00pm, March New Moon Ceremony

Cesar Chavez Park
11 Spinnaker Way
Berkeley

This will be the 19th Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty New Moon Ceremony since the signing of the treaty on September 27, 2015. Read the entire Treaty here: www.IndigenousWomenRising.org

You are invited to join us in this prayer from wherever you are on Mother Earth’s belly. In the San Francisco Bay Area, we will be meeting on the shoreline of Berkeley, California at Cesar Chavez Park, right at the end of the road where the parking circle is, at the waterfront. Feel free to bring some water from your watershed or a favorite place to share with the waters of the bay. We will have prayers for the water and prayers for guidance as we work together as defenders and protectors of Mother Earth.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1869197749981517/

Tuesday, March 28

32. Tuesday, 11:30am – 1:30pm, Funeral for Politics as Usual: tell Feinstein no more compromise

Montgomery Street Station
598 Market St.
SF

NOTE: Procession starts at Montgomery BART (Market and Montgomery) and ends outside Senator Feinstein’s office (1 Post St).

Where: McKesson Plaza – directly outside Dianne Feinstein’s office at 1 Post Street, San Francisco, CA 94104.

 Nearest BART station: Montgomery.

Put to rest Politics as Usual!

Host: Invisible San Francisco

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/233882673746671/

New Announcements for Wed. and Thurs. (from Adrienne Fong)

Send items for posting by 12 Noon on Wednesday to: afong@jps.net 

Occupy

~ San Francisco ~

Occupy San Francisco Bulletin Board

 http://www.occupysf.net

New Announcements

Wednesday, 3/22; & Thursday 3/23

Wednesday, March 22 

5.  Wednesday, 9:00am – 12pm, Pretrial for Jack and Nestor

Rene C. Davidson Courthouse, Department 7
1225 Fallon St.
Oakland

Come  support Jack and Nestor, who were arrested at an Anti Trump demo on Election Day

Sponsor: APTP

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1839948342921856/

6.  Wednesday, 12 Noon – 2:00pm, Our City College Mobilization Teach-In!

CCSF – Ocean Campus
Multi-Use Building, Room 140
50 Phelan Ave.
SF

#OurCityCollege
Come learn about the ongoing efforts to reclaim and rebuild our school! We are students who are actively opposing the class cuts, efforts to arm campus police with guns, and corporate sale/seizure of public CCSF land We will also discuss the free city college efforts and how they must be expanded to include undocumented students.

 FREE LUNCH will be provided!

THE STAKES HAVE JUST BEEN RAISED! In a shocking move, the CCSF administration violated the Brown Act on 3/16, and illegally pushed through a proposal for arming the campus police thru the 1st step of the governance process, with no public input and NO prior notice! Due to widespread outrage, the proposal has now been halted and will not yet be voted on by the Board.

But it has now become clear that these issues are even more urgent than we thought, and if we don’t act now the administration will proceed, swiftly and silently, to undermine CCSF’s community power and impose their disastrous agenda!

See sites for core demands.

Speakers:

Win-Mon Kyi and Claire Warren (student organizers, CCSF Solidarity Committee) – Introduction

Ben Bac Sierra (from Justice 4 Alex Nieto, killed by SFPD on March 21, 2014) – on Police brutality/violence and community control of police

Ardel Thomas, Marco Mojica, and Lijia Lumsden (CCSF faculty, Diversity Studies) – on Diversity/Ethnic studies, class cuts, and #FreeCityCollege

Kung Feng (Jobs With Justice) and Sara Morsy (Muslim Student Association of CCSF)- on resisting anti-immigrant oppression, and how to work towards a true Sanctuary Campus

Marcy Rein (writer, Center on Race, Poverty and the Environment and Vida Bonilla (student, PODER (SF)) –on the many corporate land grabs currently occurring at CCSF, including the proposed sale of the lower level parking lot (Balboa Reservoir)

Jacqueline Fielder (San Francisco Defund DAPL Coalition) – on #NoDAPL, and CCSF’s #Divestment from Wells Fargo

Learn more about our broad mission and vision here:https://sites.google.com/site/ccsfsolidaritycommittee2/our-mission

See Info: CCSF Solidarity Committee https://sites.google.com/site/ccsfsolidaritycommittee2/  & https://www.facebook.com/events/1438515046172157/   or https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/03/18796971.php

7,  Wednesday, 4:00pm – 6:00pm, Emergency City Hall Hearing on the Educator Housing Crisis

SF City Hall, Board of Supervisors Chambers
1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Place
SF

Skyrocketing cost of living in San Francisco has created a teacher turnover crisis that is beginning to fundamentally disrupt our schools. In fact, the SFUSD is projecting that we will lose 1 out of every 7 teachers next school year, with some schools potentially seeing a teacher turnover rate of over 50%.

District Supervisor Hillary Ronen will host a 4:00 p.m. hearing on the housing crisis for SFUSD educators. The hearing is our opportunity to tell City and District leaders loud and clear the impact the affordability crisis is having on our profession, our schools, and the students we serve! 

Host: United Educators of SF

Info / RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/1641562712806865/ 

8.  Wednesday, 4:00pm – 7:00pm, Ohlone Berkeley Shellmound Teach-in and Prayer Walk

Meet at:

2180 Milvia
Berkeley

Join your Ohlone sisters & brothers, Indigenous Women of the Americas Treaty signers and your relatives for prayers, a teach-in, round dance and prayer walk to save the Berkeley Shellmound.

The Ohlone Berkeley Shellmound is over 5,700 year old. It is the last shellmound in the San Francisco Bay Area. The sacred site and the ancestors buried there must be protected. The shellmound is located across the street from Spenger’s Restaurant in Berkeley, California. It is covered by a parking lot. A developer wants to build commercial and residential units on top of the shellmound. We say no. Join us.

We will meet at 4:00 p.m. at the Berkeley City Offices on Milvia Street for prayers, a teach-in and a round dance. Afterward we will walk 1.8 miles in prayer to the shellmound for speakers, song and prayers. 

Host: The Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1773806076281799/  

9.  Wednesday, 5:30pm – 6:30pm, PEACE VIGIL

One Post St.
(On the steps facing Market St. – below Feinstein’s office)
Above Montgomery BART
SF

All are welcomed to join Codepink, World Can’t Wait, OccupySF and Others.

Look for the bright lettered pink PEACE banner

Theme this week: DRONES

Rain or Shine. If it rains presence will be below in the BART Plaza

10.  Wednesday, 6:00pm – 7:00pm, Vigil for Amilcar, Killed by SFPD on February 26, 2015

Mission Police Station
17th Street & Valencia
SF

Over 50 vigils for Amilcar have been held.

DA Gascon has not charged any police officer with the murder of Amilcar who was shot 6 times in the back!

DA Gascon: Let us have our day in court! Charge the officers who killed Amilcar with murder!

Info: http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?u=1cffc40a58193b3d538400764&id=b829166a95

11.  Wednesday, 6:00pm – 7:30pm, Homelessness in San Francisco Workshop (event has reached capacity – standing room only)

SF Main Library
100 Larkin St.
SF

Free

Ticket info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/coalition-on-homelessness-presents-homelessness-101-workshop-tickets-32169102652

The Coalition on Homelessness presents Speak On It! Voices from the Streets. In this homeless people-led workshop, we will be covering the fundamentals of homelessness in San Francisco, busting myths about homelessness, and discussing the city’s current housing crisis. Learn first-hand what it is like to experience homelessness living on the streets, shelters, and encampments and the numerous barriers to housing that families, seniors, women, immigrants, and people with disabilities face. There are over 7,000 homeless people on the streets of San Francisco everyday.

Learn how you can be an advocate and ally for homeless San Franciscans and fight for the housing justice for all! 

For more information, contact Sam Lew at slew@cohsf.org   

Thursday, March 23

12.  Thursday, 9:00am, Sean Moore Arraignment Court Support

Hall of Justice, Department 22
850 Bryant St.
SF

Shot twice by officer Cha for obeying orders by SFPD to exit his home, Mr. Moore is in jail for “resisting arrest”. A neighbor, Mr. Choi, who called police about a noise he heard, had been advised by officer Cha to get a stay-away order for Mr. Moore.

This will be a brief court appearance

Updates: FREE SEAN MOORE! On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1823571737884585/

13.  Thursday, 6:00pm – 7:30pm, Women and Resistance: From the Panthers, to Yuppies, to Comix

California Historical Society
678 Mission St.
SF

Panel discussion about the roles women played in resistance and social protest movements in the Bay Area during the 1960s and 1970s. Hear from women who participated and led social and political movements, like the Yippies and Black Panthers, and art protest in comics and underground newspapers, like Wimmin’s Comix and the Berkeley Barb. 

Sponsor California Historical Society

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/04/18797028.php

14.  Thursday, 6:00pm – 8:30pm, Resist Together!  Reframing the Food Movement

Port Commission Hearing Room, 2nd Floor
Ferry Building
Embarcadero @ Market St.
SF

$10.00

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/resist-together-reframing-the-food-movement-tickets-32544341000?ref=ebtnebtckt

Event is for anyone interested in building the movement for a just and sustainable food system: one where immigrants are welcome, workers are cared for, people are nourished, and climate change is faced head-on. Realizing this vision will require collaboration across cultures and issues. How can the food movement support broader efforts to protect civil rights, public health, and the environment? This is a time for food, labor, climate, anti-racism, and other forces to unite.

Panel:

·                      Evelyn Rangel-Medina, Restaurant Opportunities Centers United

·                      Edwin Carmona-Cruz, La Raza Centro Legal

·                      Amelia Moore, Union of Concerned Scientists

·                      Leslie Mah, Nourish|Resist

·                      Stephen Satterfield, writer, speaker, and multimedia producer (moderator)

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/15/18797447.php

15.  Thursday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Syria, ISIS, Trump and Middle East Mayhem: What Progressives Should Know

Unitarian Universalist Center , Chapel
1187 Franklin St.
SF

Stephen Zunes will offer his insights into the current situation.

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, a contributing editor of Tikkun, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Sponsors:  San Francisco Progressive Democrats of America (SanFranpda [at] aol.com) and Unitarian Universalists for Peace and Justice-San Francisco 

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2017/03/07/18797127.php

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~

SAVE the DATE

Friday, April 7, 2017

10:00am – 3:00pm

Friday April 7th, 2017 is the One Year Anniversary of the death of Luis Góngora Pat at the hands of the SFPD.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1666830296944982/

First They Came for the Homeless update (from Mike Zint)

First they came for the homeless

March 20, 2017

I just got the heads up that council member Ben Bartlett is making moves to get us removed. He is citing trash and neighborhood complaints, according to the email.

We know why this is happening. We called the city out for the concentration camp concept they are proposing.

Here’s the deal. We saw the proposal as a community. We reacted with rage. Everyone I talked to in this community agrees with concentration camp. And we know that punishment is a possibility. But that will not stop us.

We are fighting for it all. Life. And they are fighting to stop us from providing life sustaining necessities such as shelter from the elements. They remove our choice because we have less money. And they are spending more on stopping us than they would spend helping us to help ourselves.

Help save a life. Tell city council and the mayor to get their heads out of the gentrifiers asses, and help ALL people in Berkeley.

NO CONCENTRATION CAMPS FOR THE HOMELESS!

Fund Raiser for the Resistance! (from Gwyllm Llwydd)

Fb-Button

Resistance!

“Resistance”

I put this together in response to the current “Administrations” proposed cuts to social spending on such items as “Meals On Wheels”, School Lunches, Housing Vouchers for the Poor, etc. The convoluted logic that it is passed as policy is nothing short of Barbarity. I know that we can come together in our communities to protect and stand with those less fortunate than us, those that are discriminated against, those pursued by unjust, and inhumane laws and policies.We are better than this.

I will be donating all profits from the sale of these prints at this point to “Meals on Wheels” to help support our elders, who may only have one meal a day, and who often need social contact which this program provides. I worked with MOW’s through a non-profit in Portland, and can attest to the good that is achieved.

A civilization that targets those less fortunate does not deserved to be designated as a “civilization”. Those that turn on the weakest, those that deprive others of basic necessities to enrich Oligarchs are nothing more than Sociopaths.

Organize Sisters & Brothers. Now is our time to shape a better future! We can do it.

“Resistance” Giclée Prints Options


This Swedish billionaire has issued a $5 million award for anyone who invents a UN 2.0

TT/Stefan Gustafsson

By Tom Turula (businessinsider.com)

November 2016

Laszlo Szombatfalvy, one of Sweden’s most successful investors of all time, is urging on the younger generation to rethink global governance.

Now he has issued a large award for the best idea to replace the current global governance system, through a competition called ‘A New Shape’. This was reported by Jill Bederoff, who interviewed Szombatfalvy for Veckans Affärer.

Laszlo Szombatfalvy is something like the Warren Buffett of Sweden.

Like Buffett, he started life in very humble circumstances. He arrived to Sweden from Hungary in 1956 when his native country faced Soviet oppression.

The 88-year old finance sage has one of the world’s best investing track records. Over 45 years, he has achieved an average annual return of 30 per cent.

His philanthropy aims to solve global problems.

Szombatfalvy is donating more than half a billion Swedish krona ($50m USD) through his fund, Global Challenges Foundation.

He believes radical measures are required to tackle inequality, and that the world’s rich need to take more responsibility.

Szombatfalvy believes the global governance system is failing:

”The biggest threats to humanity stem from the global community’s inability to deal with them effectively” he told Veckans Affärer.

“[The Politicians] cannot agree on the necessary measures [for climate change]. Even less are they able to agree on how to divide the costs between countries; or the responsibilities for future generations. Now only short-term national interests dominate” he continued.

His fund’s Global Challenges Prize is awarding $5m USD “in prizes for the best ideas that re-envision global governance for the 21st century”.

The Foundation’s website explains further:

“Entrants should focus on designing a decision-making structure or framework that could galvanize effective international action to tackle these risks.  The proposed model may encompass an entirely new global framework or a proposed reform for existing systems.”

The competition, called ‘A New Shape’, is open to any individual or organization, and at least $1 million will be awarded to the winner. The fund is accepting proposals until May 2017.

Here are Szombatfalvy’s 4 advice for young people:

  1. Be conscious of the fact that you are not only your own country’s citizen; you are a global citizen.
  2. Realize that your children’s and grandchildren’s living conditions to a growing extent will depend on other countries’ citizens, even more than on their compatriots.
  3. Understand, that without a global governance system that cantackle global risks, the likelihood of major catastrophes will become incomparably higher.
  4. Demand action from your elected politicans! Vote out the incompetent people – you cannot afford them!


In November 2016, the Global Challenges Foundation launches a new prize competition, a quest to find models of global cooperation capable of handling the most pressing threats to humanity. The New Shape Prize will offer US$5 million for the best ideas for a global governance frameworks to better manage the threats posed by four interlinked ‘mega-risks’: climate change, environmental damage, conflict (including nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction) and extreme poverty.

OccupyForum presents . . . “What is to be done?” with Michael Goldstein

OccupyForum presents…

Monday, March 20th, 2017 from 6 – 9 pm

at The Black and Brown Social Club

474 Valencia between 15th and 16th Streets, near 16th/Mission BART

Information, discussion & community! Monday Night Forum!!

Occupy Forum is an opportunity for open and respectful dialogue

on all sides of these critically important issues!

“What is to be done?”

Michael Goldstein

Michael Goldstein will present his challenging, promising, and unusual view of the path forward for those seeking fundamental social transformation, and then lead discussion.

He is author of the visionary book, Return of the Light: A Political Fable in Which the American People Retake Their Country, which offers a roadmap for uniting our separate campaigns to stop the worst abuses of the ruling class into a single movement. The aim of that movement: making government our own means for pooling our collective resources in the interests of peace, social justice, environmental sustainability, and a society hospitable to the needs of the human spirit.

Join us as Michael presents his analysis of the need for, and means for bringing about, the nonviolent overthrow of the government of corporate wealth, and for what promises to be a lively discussion after.

Michael Goldstein writes a blog in the Huffington Post. Last spring he spearheaded BeyondBernie.us, which circulated an open letter urging Bernie Sanders to actually help build the movement he spoke of so eloquently, not just an electoral operation. The letter called on the candidate to enable his supporters to have direct dialog with each other about how to create an ongoing movement and what its goals, strategy, and organizational forms should be. The group launched a website to assist in that process.

Michael practices law, representing indigents appealing criminal convictions, including death sentences, and he also works as a mediator.

Don Hazen, Executive Editor of Alternet, wrote that Michael’s book “Catalogues the failures of consumer capitalism and the future solutions,  at the same time and place — a very encouraging read, in a time of little optimism,” and social critic Michael Parenti described it as “clearly written, hopeful and useful for those interested in building a real democracy.”

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