Surveillance Technology Policy for SF Police Department

When:
September 12, 2022 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm America/Los Angeles Timezone
2022-09-12T10:00:00-07:00
2022-09-12T14:00:00-07:00
Where:
SF City Hall Legislative Chamber, Room 250
1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Pl. SF

 Rules Committee Meeting

San Francisco Board of Supervisors 

Surveillance Technology Policy for SF Police Department

 Use of Non-City Entity Surveillance Cameras

(Sponsored by Mayor Breed) 

Monday, September 12

10:00am

In-person

SF City Hall, Room

Legislative Chamber, Room 250

1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Pl.

SF

Remote Access

WATCH SF Cable Channel 26, 28, 78 or 99 (depending on provider) WATCH www.sfgovtv.org

Public Comment: PUBLIC COMMENT CALL-IN 1 (415) 655-0001 / Meeting ID: 2496 266 4190 # #

Press *3 to enter the speaker line)

NOTE: The last meeting only one minute was allowed for each public comment!

AgendaMeeting Agenda (sfbos.org)

 Item 7 (last item on agenda)

Committee Members: Aaron Peskin, Rafael Mandelman, Connie Chan

YOUR VOICES ARE NEEDED!

The rules committee of the SF Board of Supervisors will be again taking up whether or not to let the SFPD use privately owned camera networks to monitor the streets in real time.

While we have won important concessions on the retention time for historical video and sharing with out of state or federal agencies; the fix is in regarding letting cops commandeer private cameras for real time viewing. SF surveillance ordinance sponsor and chair of the rules committee, Supervisor Aaron Peskin, has a deal with SFPD and mayor London Breed for a year-long pilot program to authorize real-time live monitoring.

We say this:

* It’s wrong without an immediate threat to life (an exigent circumstance) — and the SF Bar Association agrees

* SFPD plans to real-time monitor “significant events” to assist with crowd control (demonstrations) are unacceptable

* Such a pilot must have specific metrics for impact, including reductions in crime clearance rates, increases in police response to crime reports, and evidence of real time arrests made or it is just an excuse for more police surveillance. Where are the metrics for provable public safety impact in this pilot?

Info from Oakland Privacy: Action Alert: San Francisco and Berkeley (mailchi.mp)

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