‘Housing is a human right’: Berkeley homeless services provide rehabilitation

FEBRUARY 28, 2019 (dailycal.org)

hub_peterradu_courtesy-copy

PETER RADU/COURTESY

BY CLARA RODAS | STAFF

Over the course of one year, at least 2,000 people in Berkeley experience homelessness for some period of time, according to information gathered by the city’s Health, Housing and Community Services, or HHCS, department. Currently, Berkeley offers various rehabilitation programs to provide the local homeless population shelter, housing and mental health services.

Berkeley’s central entry point for homeless services is the Coordinated Entry System, or CES, which happens through the North County Hub. As a policy, the CES aims to address homelessness in an efficient and equitable manner by incorporating three main practices throughout Berkeley homeless services: standardization, prioritization and coordination.

“Our goal is to get people sheltered and into housing,” said city spokesperson Matthai Chakko. “Through the hub, we created a single point of entry for the homeless. … This is how we get people into housing and supportive housing.”

The hub collaborates with the cities of Berkeley, Albany and Emeryville as well as the Berkeley Food and Housing Project to provide services. Homeless people or people at risk of homelessness begin the entry process by calling 211 or through outreach staff members who visit parks, encampments and shelters.

From there, callers are screened, and their homeless situations are assessed in order to transfer them to the correct services offered by Berkeley. Single adults and people from the ages of 18 to 25 are transferred directly to the hub, while families are transferred to the Family Front Door in Oakland.

“Through the Coordinated Entry System, we are tracking everyone and helping those that are most in need,” Chakko said. “Not only is what we’re doing the best practice, we are following a federal mandate to make it easier to address homelessness.”

Toya Groves, a housing specialist at the Berkeley Drop In Center, acts as an advocate for high-need clients who go through a reassessment process. After assessment over the phone, clients are placed on a list that categorizes them based on their needs.

Individuals assessed to have high needs such as long-term homelessness or disabilities are prioritized and placed higher on the list. According to Groves, however, a client who had recently suffered from a stroke was placed at No. 600 on the list before Groves advocated for his reassessment.

“The list is always moving — you refer someone, and someone may be assessed to have more need than the person you referred,” Groves said. “I had to advocate for (my client) to get on a higher spot — it was a very long and drawn-out process.”

Groves added that people who frequent the Berkeley Drop In Center are predominantly people of color who have historically lived in southern Berkeley and have been “pushed” out of their homes. While the city of Berkeley and the hub provide homeless services, Groves said more can be done.

According to Groves, “bureaucratic” issues within the hub’s system cause overlap in the distribution of services. Groves added that she hopes the Berkeley Drop In Center will be given a position to directly help clients instead of only being able to refer them to the hub.

“Sometimes people get matched for five different housing (options), and they’re hard to find,” Grove said. “This holds up potential housing opportunities. … There must be a more efficient way to adequately serve the homeless population — I think that the hub recognizes those issues as well.”

According to Mike Zint, co-founder of the homeless activist group First They Came for the Homeless, drug and mental health rehabilitation are “almost nonexistent” through the hub.

The hub gets “lots” of complaints from homeless community members, according to Zint. He added that the city needs to listen to its homeless population.

“The hub attempts to provide services,” Zint said. “I say ‘attempts’ because there is little housing, and all the homeless are competing for what’s available.”

One such resource is the Pathways STAIR Navigation Center that opened its doors in June 2018 and offers services for up to 45 people at a time. The center is run by Bay Area Community Services through Berkeley city funds.

On-site services at the center include peer counselors with experience as formerly homeless people; the peer counselors assess entering clients and create personalized plans for rehabilitation. Almanza added that the center offers skill-building so that clients have the skills necessary to succeed once they leave to permanent housing.

“The Pathways center is a rapid-rehousing program for individuals in Berkeley for the homeless,” said Bay Area Community Services Executive Director Jamie Almanza. “Once they leave, we get to make sure that … they still stay in their permanent housing.”

According to Almanza, the center works in three stages: outreach, on-site services and aftercare services. Almanza added that since the center’s opening, it has served more than 100 people and has permanently housed more than 70 percent of its clients.

The center’s outreach team is in charge of going into encampments and into the community, according to Almanza. She added that the center also partners with the CES to assist people with priority status.

“I really believe housing is a human right, and I have dedicated my career to helping people that need support,” Almanza said. “Whether you live with a mental illness, addiction and all of the systematic things that contribute to homelessness, you have to have a roof over your head if you want to contribute to society.”

Contact Clara Rodas at crodas@dailycal.org and follow her on Twitter at @ClaraRodas10.

‘Incessant Warmongering’ Pays Off: Critics Respond to Nikki Haley Joining Boeing’s Board

February 26, 2019 by Common Dreams

“The ‘adult in the room’ who could ‘talk tough’ at the UN just became a war profiteer. Love this country!”

by Eoin Higgins, staff writer

Photo: United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley attends a media briefing during the United Nations General Assembly on September 24, 2018 in New York City. (PHOTO by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley is expected to join the board of directors for weapons systems and aircraft maker Boeing on April 29 – a continuation of the Washington revolving door system between government and private corporations. “It’s an honor to have the opportunity to contribute to Boeing’s continued success as a cutting edge industry leader and a great American company,” Haley said in a statement. News of the Boeing appointment came less than 24 hours after Haley announced she was forming a new policy group, “Stand America Now.” Haley, who was Governor of South Carolina from 2011 to 2017 before accepting the ambassador’s position in the Trump administration, left her U.N. post at the end of 2018 after almost two years at the position. She’s been mentioned as a possible future presidential contender and is frequently referred to as a possible foil for the president she served under. For now, though, Haley seems intent on cashing in. She’ll join Boeing’s board as the company deals with difficult decisions about its future growth. Per Reuters:

Haley’s nomination comes as Boeing grapples with a major decision: whether to launch an all-new jetliner known as NMA, a midsize plane that would serve a niche market falling between narrow- and wide-body aircraft.

The company’s work on airliners was not, however, the main source of concern for critics of Haley’s appointment. Rather, commenters on social media wryly noted the appropriateness of the former ambassador making a lateral move to a company that deals in war. Boeing is one of the largest defense contractors in the U.S., pulling in $20.5 billion in Pentagon for 2018. Boeing’s board will vote on whether or not to approve Haley’s appointment on April 29. It was not clear if she will replace a board member or if a seat has been created for her.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License

All hail!

February 26, 2019 (bigthink.com)
San Francisco’s monarch who once “ruled” America.
 
Joshua Norton lost his wealth and his mind before declaring himself Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico in 1859.

His first act as emperor was to abolish Congress and the Republican and Democratic parties. He also requested the formation of the League of Nations, demanded a bridge and tunnel between San Francisco and Oakland (both of which now exist), and issued his own currency – which people in the area accepted.

While Emperor Norton’s decrees were not respected in the capitol, his royal personage was absolutely sacrosanct in San Francisco.
 He was a popular character, sporting a royal blue uniform with gold epaulettes, a hat set off with a peacock feather and a decorative rose, and a sabre on his hip. Businesses gave him free goods, others paid him “taxes”.
 
When a security guard arrested Emperor Norton for vagrancy, the public outcry was immense. According to one daily newspaper, “since he has worn the Imperial purple he has shed no blood, robbed nobody, and despoiled the country of no one, which is more than can be said for his fellows in that line.” Emperor Norton was quickly freed, and from then on, all police officers saluted him in the streets.
 
When he died in 1880, 10,000 people attended his funeral.
 
He was the first and last Emperor of the United States of America.

An Ocean of Lies on Venezuela: Abby Martin & UN Rapporteur Expose Coup

Empire Files Published on Feb 22, 2019

Keep Empire Files independent and ad-free: https://www.patreon.com/empirefiles On the eve of another US war for oil, Abby Martin debunks the most repeated myths about Venezuela and uncovers how US sanctions are crimes against humanity with UN Investigator and Human Rights Rapporteur Alfred De Zayas.

FOLLOW // @EmpireFiles // @AbbyMartin LIKE // https://www.facebook.com/TheEmpireFiles

(Courtesy of Bob of Occupy)

Articles ~ Actions ~ Announcements, Wed. Feb. 26 – Sat. March 2 (from Adrienne Fong)

Periodic Announcements

Please encourage groups you are involved in to post events on Indybay: https://www.indybay.org/calendar/?page_id=12

Thank you to all who are posting there!

     Check Indybay for other events that might interest you.

ACCESSIBILITY: Please include Accessibility Information on events! 

CHILDCARE Please indicate if available for events. 

ARTICLES:

A. House to vote on measure revoking Trump’s emergency order – February 26, 2019

https://www.apnews.com/1e104c6b06b44e7bb395d71f9f0097ed

B. Kamala Harris told AIPAC she backs Israel because of civil rights struggle in Selma, 1965 – February 25, 2019

https://mondoweiss.net/2019/02/harris-because-struggle/?fbclid=IwAR16ttDPLAUNNUQM3ZDQhn5IQ4uvlG3DMWhQ_aRwNYvxW2efcY2ESH3Xg4o

C. Eight years on, Fukushima Still Poses Health Risks for Japanese and American Children – February 24, 2019

   Save the Date: March 11th – 8th Anniversary of Fukushima – at SF Japanese Consulate!

D. Honduran Teen Fled Gangs at Home Only to be Murdered While Stranded at the U.S.- Mexico Border – February 23, 2019

https://theintercept.com/2019/02/23/unaccompanied-minor-migrants-us-border-policy/?fbclid=IwAR3hqG3ESyeUcoRTGfEGDHMVS0oSKMw849C6M5Pl95wFOW4yp6QmvlaOXAY

E. Israeli Pharmaceutical Firms Test Drugs on Palestinian Detainees – February 22, 2019

F. 70,000 Mexican Workers Strike _ not being reported  – February 19, 2019

and

200 million Hindus Strike January 2019 in India!

3 – ACTIONS:

1. Tell Congress: Don’t let Trump use the military to intervene in Venezuela

   SIGN: https://act.credoaction.com/sign/venezuela-Cicilline?t=4&akid=31669%2E21110%2E1oDrXz

2. Demand Congress Stop Trump’s dangerous “Salute to America” parade.

  SIGN: https://act.winwithoutwar.org/act/stop-trump-ego-parade-2_copy?source=em20190225&t=4&akid=3216%2E294094%2EETPvI0

3. End Draft Registration Once and For ALL!

   SIGN: https://couragetoresist.org/petition-end-draft-registration/

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Wednesday, February 27 – Saturday, March 2

Wednesday, February 27

1. Wednesday, 11:30am – 1:00pm, Commemoration of Wounded Knee 1973

Department of Justice

450 Golden Gate Ave.

SF

“Liberation Day” Commemoration of the Warriors At Wounded Knee 1973, February 27, 2019, held at noon time rally/vigil from11:30-1 pm at Dept. of Justice, 450 Golden Gate Street. Speakers, Drum, songs, sage, Dancers and poetry! Call 415-577-1492 for more information!

For more event information:  http://www.aim-west.org

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2019/02/13/18821154.php

2. Wednesday, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Lobbying for Sweeps Hearing

SF City Hall

1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Pl.

SF 

Come to City Hall to encourage the Supervisors to show up and support Matt Haney’s Hearing on Rainstorm Sweeps. We’ll walk around to each Supervisor’s office and convey the importance of this hearing. All are welcome, there’s no need to speak if you don’t want to. We’ll meet outside the front entrance of City Hall at 2pm.

Background: SFPD and the Department of Public Works (DPW), collaborating with the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing, have continued the cruel and inhumane practice of “sweeps”, forced relocation and property confiscation of those living on the streets. During the last two rainstorms we know that DPW and SFPD confiscated tents, sleeping bags, and survival gear handed out by DSA SF and allies, leaving people with no way to protect themselves from the elements. Very few politicians in SF have been willing to own up to sweeps being official city policy, but Sup. Haney has given us a rare opportunity to spotlight the lack of services available during winter storms and the ensuing sweeps

Sponsor: DSA of SF, Glide, Harvey Milk LGBTQ, Coalition on Homelessnes, Indivisible SF

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/631169830629609/

3. Wednesday, 3:30pm, All out at the school board to stop spending cuts and AB 1840 (New)

1050 2nd Ave.

Oakland

The school board will be holding a special meeting to approve over $20M in spending cuts in 19-20. These cuts include $3M in cuts directly from schools and laying off nearly 150 central staff. They plan on making this vote even though there is currently an unexplained $60M increase in expenditures and our teachers are on strike. This is unacceptable and as we say it’s#FailureByDesign.

We need an all out effort to stop the school board from voting on spending cuts for next year. The school board has until March 1st to approve these cuts to qualify for AB 1840. We also need to demand that the school board direct the superintendent to settle a fair contract with our teachers.

2:30-4 Join the La Escuelita/MetWest/Dewey High School teacher picket lines

4-5:30 community picket line at the school board meeting 

5:30 Rally

6:00 Meeting starts

Sponsor: Oakland Public Education Network

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2347934678754882/?notif_t=plan_edited¬if_id=1550994007113139

4. Wednesday, 5:30pm – 8:30pm. OUSD: NO library closures! (New)

La Escuelita Elementary

1100 3rd Ave.

Oakland

Tell the board NO to school library closures! Yes to equitable funding! 

What’s happening?
A proposed change to Measure G funding will close libraries or drastically reduce services across the district.

La Escuelita Education Center, 1050 2nd Ave, Oakland CA 94606 
5:30 Free Dinner!
6:00 – 9:00: Speak during public comment. Students are prioritized to speak first. This will be a hot topic meeting so be prepared to wait a while.
• Voices from ALL Oakland neighborhoods are needed!
• For more information about speaking, contact Bret Harte and Redwood Heights parent Lisa Rothman: lisa@lisarothman.com

Other ways to support:
  Sign and share the petition at: https://www.saveschoollibrarians.org/ousd2019

Sponsor: Save Oakland School Libraries

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/777611442607870/

5. Wednesday 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Honoring 104 Years of the Redstone Labor Temple!

2940 16th St.

SF

FREE

Join us and the rest of the community to honor 104 years of organizing towards social and economic justice by the tenants of San Francisco’s historic Redstone Labor Temple!
live music, artists, dancers, poets y performers

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1671690786329290/

6.  Wednesday, 6:30pm – 7:30pm, Welcoming deray and her sad blue vest (Boycott Manny’s) (Updated)

Manny’s

16th & Valencia St.

SF


Manny has invited deray mckesson to his upscale wine bar where zionists get rowdy for no reason. join the community boycott!

This challenge to the woke-washed zionist gentrification pioneered by manny and his establishment is organized weekly by black and brown folks, jews, mission housing tenants, queer and transpeople and others committed to collective liberation. we proudly oppose anti-semitism, zionism, racism, colonialism, gentrification and all other forms of oppression.

Please honor this Boycott! By NOT attending or scheduling events there. Let Manny know why.

Sponsor: Boycott Manny’s

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1455155348017458/?active_tab=about

7. Wednesday, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Honoring Jeff Adachi: Vigil and March (New)

Meet at:

555 – 7th St. (Nr. Hall of Injustice)

SF

March to SF City Hall

San Franciscans are mourning the passing of our DEFENDER, Jeff Adachi, who stood up for our most marginalized and always spoke truth to power.

Community leaders and the San Francisco Office of the Public Defenders invite you to join us in honoring Jeff Adachi’s legacy in the fights for civil liberties, racial justice, immigration rights. Let’s come together this Wednesday evening to remember Adachi and commit to carry his fight together.

We will gather at the Public Defender’s office for a candle light vigil and then march to City Hall.

Between this site and the Public Defenders site – over 700 people have signed up to attend.

Co-Sponsored by many groups. 

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2310402975638478/

Thursday, February 28

8. Thursday, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Press Conference – Justice for All Victims of Vallejo PD Terror

Vallejo City Hall

555 Santa Clara St.

Vallejo

In response to yet another police murder in Vallejo, Attorney John Burris is holding a press conference for all families whose loved ones have been killed by Vallejo PD. Join us on on Thursday February 28th at 2pm at Vallejo city hall. Please come out to Vallejo to support these families! Vallejo PD is among the worst in the state. We Demand JUSTICE!

Sponsor: APTP

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2714157761942590/

9. Thursday, 5:00pm – 7:00pm, SF <3 Striking Teachers: Happy Hour Benefit

El Rio

3158 Mission St.

SF

Oakland teachers are on strike for the schools our kids deserve. Show your love at this happy hour benefit so that teachers can keep up the strike!

Teachers & families are fighting for smaller class sizes, support for students, a living wage that helps teachers keep teaching and an end to school closures that are hurting Black & Brown families. Join the national #RedforEd movement to defend public education! 

Donations will go to the Oakland Education Association’s Member Assistance Fund which helps financially precarious teachers that are sacrificing their paychecks for the cause, and to materials and porta potties necessary for the strike.

Sponsored by Jobs with Justice SF, United Educators of San Francisco, and the DSA SF Labor Organizing Committee.#Unite4OaklandKids #OUSDStrike

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/567272967109065/

10. Thursday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, A Tribute To Jeff Adachi: Black History Month Reception

Fillmore Heritage Center

1330 Fillmore St.

SF

Tickets are $40 and for Law School Students $25. 

Tickets can be purchased by sending payment via Venmo to @Anisa-Sirur or PayPal to smith.tenette@gmail.

In light of the recent death of Jeff Adachi, this year’s Black History Month Reception will feature a Tribute to Jeff Adachi. 
There will be entertainment, food and open bar!

We will also feature spoken word poets Karla Brundage & Jada Imani.

Sponsor: Public Defender’s Office

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/345598946051362/

Friday, March 1

11. Friday, 4:30pm – 6:30pm, HOMEY Grand Re-Opening!

H.O.M.E.Y.

2221 Mission St.

SF

We are so excited to be unveiling our new space at 2221 Mission and invite everyone to come and celebrate with us. We will have food, soft drinks and Banda Sin Nombre performing for us! We hope to see you there! Doors will open at 4:30pm. This event is family-friendly and free of charge to our community.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2155217171474417/

Saturday, March 2

12. Saturday, 10:00am – 12Noon, Community Forum on Kaiser Convention Center Redevelopment

The Forum at Laney College

900 Fallon St.

Oakland

*** Register here: http://bit.ly/2SrWFOt ***
Please message tkang@oaklandca.gov if you need childcare or translation.


Did you know? The historic Henry J. Kaiser Convention Center is where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. addressed 7,000 East Bay residents in 1962 on the anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Now, Orton Development proposes to rehabilitate and adaptively reuse the center as a performing arts venue and office space for arts and non-profit organizations.

Join Councilmember Nikki Fortunato Bas 4 Oakland and Laney College Facilities Planning Committee to hear plans from Orton and share feedback and questions about the project

If you cannot attend, please share your opinion through this survey District 2’s office is conducting: http://bit.ly/2Smky52

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/633330277088185/

13. Saturday, 3:00pm – 5:00pm, Stand with the People’s Uprising in Haiti

East Side Arts Alliance

2277 International Blvd.

Oakland

Join Haiti Action Committee to hear an eyewitness report about the unstoppable fight of Haiti’s people for liberty and justice. Since February 7th, which was the anniversary of Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s 1991 inauguration as Haiti’s first democratically elected president, hundreds of thousands of Haitians have been demonstrating in the streets of cities and towns throughout the country. When thousands are in the streets in Europe, we see live coverage. Not so with Haiti. The U.S. and the Haitian elite are afraid of the mobilization of the poor. Silence and disinformation are weapons of empire to marginalize the struggle of the Haitian people.

Chanting, “we are hungry, we can’t take it anymore,” protesters demand that the totally corrupt and fraudulently (s)elected president, Jovenel Moise, resign immediately. Police and para-military forces have killed at least 12 people, with many more wounded. Protests have come in waves ever since Moise was announced the winner of the sham electoral process in late 2017. Moise refuses to step down, and ominously threatens to “clean up the country.”

Oil supplied to Haiti through PetroCaribe, Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution project, lies at the heart of the protests. Through Petrocaribe, Venezuela sells oil at a discounted rate to a country out of solidarity, with the expectation that the oil will be sold at market rate and the profit used for economic development of the country. In Haiti, a new report by a government watchdog group documents $4.2 BILLION of this profit has disappeared, unaccounted for. The report lists a number of companies that have received the money, two owned by Moise, with no accounting for how it was spent. Meanwhile, teachers have not been paid for months, and sanitation services are nil. High inflation makes even the basics unaffordable for many people. Haitians throughout the country demand to know what happened to the money, while police and members of Moise’s PHTK Party attack demonstrators with impunity, reminiscent of the Duvalier ton-ton macoutes death squads.

Sponsors: Haiti Action Committee & East Side Arts Alliance

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2476235042405754/

14. Saturday, 4:00pm – 6:00pm, The Mass Mexican Worker’s Strikes: Report by Mexican Congressman Fernández Noroña

ILWU Local 34 (next to ballpark)

4 Berry St./801 2nd St. (Free parking)

SF

The Current Situation in Mexico After the Election of Andrés Manuel López Obrador and the Need for Greater Cross-Border Solidarity

Special FORUM in San Francisco, CA Featuring Mexican Member of Congress  José Gerardo Fernández Noroña

On November 28, 2018, Congressman José Gerardo Fernán- dez Noroña received a delegation from the National Independent and Democratic Union of Farm Workers (SINDJA) and the Al- liance of National, State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice of the Valley of San Quintín, Baja California. They were accompanied by leaders of the Sacramento (California) chapter of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), affiliated to the AFL-CIO. 


The Sacramento LCLAA delegates have been spearheading the effort across the United States in support of the farm workers in San Quintin through the Driscoll’s Corp. boycott campaign. 

During their meeting, which was held in the offices of the Mexi- can Congress, the trade unionists from California asked Congressman Fernández Noroña his position 

on the new free trade agreement, known in Mexico as the T-MEC and in the United States as the USMCA. Congressman Fernández Noroña explained that in his speech before the Congress on October 2, 2018, he had been very clear, stating: “The treaty, which according to Donald Trump is ‘very good,’ is deeply harmful to our national interests.”

For more info see site

San Francisco Labor Council (AFL-CIO), LIUNA Laborers’ Local 270, Instituto Laboral de la Raza, Sacramento Chapter of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2019/02/23/18821407.php

15. Saturday, 5:30pm – 9:00pm, UUSF Spaghetti Dinner for Social Justice

First Unitarian Universalist Society – SF

1187 Franklin St.

SF

Wheelchair accessible

$20 Donation, no one turned away

5:30 pm – Spaghetti Dinner& No Host Bar * 7:00 – Program

“People of Color Human Rights” will feature keynote speaker Angela Brown, M.Div. former Glide Minister and S.F. Public Defender.

2019 Awardees: 

  Matt Gonzalez,  Francisco Ugarte, Michael Hinckley &  S.F. Public Defenders

  Bradley Angel— Green Action

  Karl Kramer— S.F. Living Wage Coalition

Sponsor: UUSF – Social Justice Council

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2019/02/12/18821129.php  and  Melvin Starks (510) 246-7730 or sjc@uusf.org

MOVING TOWARD A SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC BANK

February 2019

By Dr. Derek Kerr (westsideobserver.com)

Animated by indigenous tribes protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and its threat to the Standing Rock Sioux water rights, local supporters lobbied to divest from banks funding oil pipelines. In March 2017, the Board of Supervisors directed City Treasurer Jose Cisneros to do so. But those banks also financed private prisons, hedge funds, weapons manufacturers, fossil fuels, tobacco interests, and luxury real estate. Plus their predatory practices cheated customers and tanked the financial system. When it came to loans for City housing, infrastructure, transit and higher education, their interest charges were steep. Since the Westside Observer’s May 2017 article “A Public Bank for San Francisco” appeared, much has happened.

During the early 1900s, North Dakota’s economy was based on agriculture, specifically wheat. Frequent drought and harsh winters didn’t make it easy to earn a living. The arduous growing season was further complicated by grain dealers outside the state who suppressed grain prices, farm suppliers who increased their prices, and banks in Minneapolis and Chicago which raised the interest rates on farm loans, sometimes up to 12%.North Dakotans were frustrated and attempts to legislate fairer business practices failed.A.C. Townley, a politician who was fired from the Socialist Party, organized the Non-Partisan League with the intent of creating a farm organization that protected the social and economic position of the farmer.The Non-Partisan League gained control of the Governor’s office, majority control of the House of Representatives and one third of the seats in the Senate in 1918. Their platform included state ownership and control of marketing and credit agencies. In 1919, the state legislature established Bank of North Dakota (BND) and the North Dakota Mill and Elevator Association. BND opened July 28, 1919 with $2 million of capital.

Per the Controller’s SF OpenBook website, the City paid private banks a whopping $581,707,462 in debt interest on bonds and loans in 2017-18. Of that amount, taxpayers owed up to $121 million, according to the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. The rest was owed by ratepayers using water, transit, airport and other revenue-generating services. Either way, bank executives, shareholders and bond holders reaped the proceeds. Also, the Treasurer’s Office reported $864,000 in bank fees last year. In response to public pressure to save money and place our money where our values are, City officials, like those in Oakland and Los Angeles, began exploring Public Banks, utilities that serve the public good.

Public input also favored divesting from Bank of America and Wells Fargo. However, the Treasurer’s Office finds it daunting to ‘create a Public Bank from scratch.”

Pursuant to the Board of Supervisors’ Resolution 152-17, sponsored by Malia Cohen, Sandra Lee Fewer, Jeff Sheehy, and Hillary Ronen, Treasurer Cisneros organized a 16-member Municipal Bank Feasibility Task Force. At Supervisor Fewer’s request, the Budget & Legislative Analyst’s Office issued a November 2017 report upholding Public Banking and other community supportive banking options.

Bank of North Dakota

After 9 months of deliberations and consultations with experts and other municipalities, the Municipal Bank Feasibility Task Force released an Executive Summary in September 2018. It presented 4 models.

The Wholesale Municipal Bank, providing real estate, small business, and student loans, was based on the nation’s oldest public bank, the Bank of North Dakota. It would cost $134 million upfront, plus $425 million over 10 years, and would lose $60 million before showing a profit by year 10. However, a full-service municipal bank offering direct loans to consumers, small businesses, and students would lose $84 million over 10 years and “will never be profitable.”

The most viable model, a Commercial Municipal Bank, would use the City’s General Fund for lending. By not taking deposits, it would eliminate the complexity and costs of a getting a charter. It would make money by year 2, and a $17 million profit by year 10. But it wouldn’t break from Wall Street or provide consumer loans.

On 12/13/18, the Board’s Budget & Finance Committee heard updates from the Treasurer’s Office regarding the Municipal Banking Task Force. Its service priorities are affordable housing, small businesses, infrastructure, unbanked residents, then cannabis. Turns out the 4 models proposed in September took flak for being “too small – not thinking big” according to Amanda Kahn Fried. Public input also favored divesting from Bank of America and Wells Fargo. However, the Treasurer’s Office finds it daunting to “create a Public Bank from scratch,” declines to recommend a Public Bank, and hasn’t provided a roadmap to establish one. By focusing on the costs of a Public Bank, the social costs of depositing public dollars in private banks are obscured. Supervisors Cohen and Fewer urged the Treasurer’s Office to “think big,” move beyond its comfort zone, and create a path forward with State legislators. The goal would be “local control, financial empowerment, and transparency” for the City’s $11 billion bank balance. Accordingly, the Task Force will present 3 new models: Divestment, Re-Investment, and a Combination at its last meeting at 3 PM on January 31, Room 305, City Hall.

The counting room at the Bank of North Dakota

Meanwhile, on 1/10/19 over 200 people packed the Women’s Building to launch the San Francisco Public Bank Coalition (SFPublicBank.org). Among the speakers were former Supervisor John Avalos and Supervisor Fewer. Avalos, who pioneered hearings on Public Banking in 2011, recalled how private banks were bailed out by taxpayers, while thousands of residents lost their homes or were displaced from the City. He too defaulted and lost his home. Supervisor Fewer emphasized “there is no social justice without economic justice.” Since money is power, she wondered why the City renders its $11 billion fund unto predatory banks.

Julie Carter from the California Nurses Association explained how big banks fund corporations that exploit people and harm public health. She viewed a Public Bank as supporting public health and well-being, while serving as an antidote to corporate greed and profiteering. Claire Lau from the SF Berniecrats, and Fernando Marti from the Council of Community Housing Organizations, also voiced enthusiastic support. Dozens of other community groups support the concept. SF Public Bank Coalition organizers Kurtis Wu and Jackie Fielder announced their intention to place a Public Bank Charter Amendment before voters in November. Supporters can check SFPublicBank.org for educational sessions and work groups.

Regulatory and political hurdles abound. Last November, Los Angeles placed a Charter Amendment on the ballot to allow the creation of a Public Bank. A robust 44% of voters approved – but it failed. Oakland, Berkeley and Alameda commissioned a study concluding that a multi-Jurisdictional Public Bank was feasible. But the Oakland Treasurer’s Office rejected it citing “no clear roadmap, structure or supporting data.” As for cannabis, an exhaustive study by the California Treasurer’s Office found that “No State-backed financial institution designed to support the cannabis industry is feasible. All alternatives fail on both risk and financial grounds.”Banks handling marijuana proceeds risk asset seizures and employee prosecutions for enabling a federal crime.

Yet the quest to transform banking is gaining momentum. In 2016, the second US Public Bank, the Territorial Bank of American Samoa, opened with Federal Reserve approval. Hundreds of Public Banks thrive in Germany and Europe. The nascent Green New Deal movement dovetails with Public Banking. Recall the Great Depression when President Roosevelt tapped the publicly-owned Reconstruction Finance Corporation to finance New Deal infrastructure – without Congressional appropriations. While campaigning, now-Governor Newsom declared, “We must break Wall Street’s chokehold on state finances and develop our own state bank.”

Meanwhile, City Treasurer Cisneros actively pursues socially responsible investments. In 2018, the “Safe, Sound and Local” program allocated $80 million from the County’s Pooled Investment Fund to banks and credit unions to boost community lending. Other City agencies facilitate loans. For example, the Mayor’s Office of Community & Economic Development backs $86 million in home loans for lower-income residents. Such services will expand as support for a Public Bank grows.

Dr. Derek Kerr was a senior physician at Laguna Honda Hospital where he repeatedly exposed wrongdoing by the Department of Public Health. Contact: DerekOnVanNess@aol.com

February 2019

Articles ~ Actions ~ Announcements, Sunday, Feb. 24 – Wednesday, Feb. 27 (from Adrienne Fong)

Periodic Announcements

Please encourage groups you are involved in to post events on Indybay: https://www.indybay.org/calendar/?page_id=12

Thank you to all who are posting there!

     Check Indybay for other events that might interest you.

ACCESSIBILITY: Please include Accessibility Information on events! 

CHILDCARE Please indicate if available for events. 

ARTICLES:

A.  A Call to Halt an Illegal Invasion of Venezuela  – February 24, 2019

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/02/24/call-halt-illegal-invasion-venezuela

   See action #1

~    ~    ~    ~    ~

B. 

   R.I.P.

  ♥ Jeff Adachi ♥

ABC

ABC7 obtains San Francisco police report on death of Public Defender Jeff Adachi – February 24, 2019

https://abc7news.com/society/abc7-obtains-sfpd-report-on-jeff-adachi-death/5153863/

SF Chronicle

Jeff Adachi’s biggest fights: An innocent man, ‘Textgate’ and a shooting on Pier 14 – February 23, 2019

https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Jeff-Adachi-s-biggest-fights-An-innocent-man-13639823.php

SF Chronicle

Matt Gonzalez to lead SF Public Defender’s Office after Adachi’s death – February 23, 2019

https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Matt-Gonzalez-to-lead-SF-Public-Defender-s-13639576.php#photo-16973637

Mission Local

Public Defender Jeff Adachi dies

~    ~    ~    ~    ~

C.  How Police Violence Paves The Way To Authoritarianism – February 23, 2019

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/brazil-police-violence-jair-bolsonaro_n_5c475d0ae4b027c3bbc61a54

D.  US lawmakers bully Ireland over move to ban Israel’s settlement goods  – February 23, 2019

https://electronicintifada.net/content/us-lawmakers-bully-ireland-over-move-ban-israels-settlement-goods/26736

E.  Gov. Newsom orders new DNA testing in Kevin Cooper’s 1983 quadruple murder case out of Chino Hills – February 22, 2019

F.  Migrant Youth Go From A Children’s Shelter To Adult Detention On Their 18th Birthday – February 22, 2019

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/22/696834560/migrant-youth-go-from-a-childrens-shelter-to-adult-detention-on-their-18th-birth

G.  Vallejo officer in Willie McCoy shooting killed another man in 2018 – February 21, 2019

https://www.sfchronicle.com/crime/article/Officer-in-Willie-McCoy-shooting-killed-another-13632671.php?fbclid=IwAR2f_MNef5cqAIq5o-W9J-TmaElQn8vVWDO9biTNBQ7QipWzbT7q92LBsbY

   R.I.P.

 ♥ Willie McCoy♥

ACTIONS:

1.  Tell Congress: Don’t let Trump use the military to intervene in Venezuela

   SIGN: https://act.credoaction.com/sign/venezuela-Cicilline?t=4&akid=31669%2E21110%2E1oDrXz

2.  Keep the Redstone Labor Temple a Community Center!

  SIGN: https://www.change.org/p/london-breed-keep-the-redstone-labor-temple-a-community-center-b717122b-f62c-43cd-8468-1ae187c2d12c

3.  Tell Congress to Pass a Green New Deal

  SIGN: https://www.signherenow.org/petition/green-new-deal/civic-action/?firstName=Adrienne&lastName=Fong&email=afong@jps.net&zip=94115&ask=5&amounts=5,25,50,100,250,500&code=jtk35-ja-nd&redirect=https%3A%2F%2Fsurveys.signforgood.com%2Fca-GND%3Fcode%3Djtk35-ja-nd

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Sunday, February 24 – Wednesday, February 27

Sunday, February 24

1.  Sunday, 11:00am – 4:00pm, Teachers Strike ART BUILD

Oakland Education Association

272 E. 12th St. (at 3rd Ave. 6 blocks from Lake Merritt BART)

Oakland

Join us to paint and screen print flags and banners for the 80 school sites on strike. Wear clothes you can paint in. We will be in a parking garage, so dress warm. Please bring your used plastic yogurt type container for paint. Snacks and drinks to share welcome.

Teachers are the frontline cutting edge fighting the austerity, privatization and corporatization that threatens education and all public goods, our climate and planet and communities. Let’s make sure they have good art for the picket lines.

Host: David Solnit

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/383370295544825/

2.  Sunday, 12Noon – 1:00pm, Anti-Trafficking Coalition at Berkeley: Open Training

The Blum Center for Developing Economics

UC Berkeley

100 Blum Hall

Berkeley

Our Education Committee will be hosting an open training for anyone who is interested in learning more about the basic details of human trafficking

Topics that we will be covering include: Labor Trafficking, Sex Trafficking, Points of Vulnerability, and “The Individual vs The Movement,” and will give a brief overview of a variety of important topics in the field. This is a training designed for those with little to no knowledge of human trafficking.

Sponsor: Berkeley Anti-Trafficking Coalition

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/556732558145853/

3.  Sunday, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, Poverty Scholarship /POOR Press Book Release Events

San Francisco Main Library

100 Larkin St., Koret Auditorium

SF

Poor, Unhoused and Disabled “Poverty Skolaz” release a book sharing their truly innovative solutions to homelessness and poverty and launch a national theatre production on poverty, homelessness and criminalization of poor people

“Us poor and homeless people in the US are in a state of emergency- between the demolitions of thousands of units of public housing,the extreme rise in gentrification and evictions of low-income and working class elders and families and the concurrent rise in the criminalization of unhoused encampments and our bodies, which is why it is so urgent for people to listen to our own innovative solutions to poverty and homelessness- solutions like Poverty Scholarship and the Homefulness Project, said Lisa Gray-Garcia,formerly homeless single parent, author of Poverty Scholarship – Poor People-led Theory Art, Words and Tears Across Mama Earth and Criminal of Poverty – Growing Up Homeless in America

“Poverty Skolaz” while also teaching, sharing and offering workshops in academic institutions and organizations on the equally innovative funding strategies outlined in Poverty Scholarship, seeking to learn how to form, create, support, serve in a different relationship with communities in the deepening crisis of poverty and homelessness across the US and beyond.

The notion of poverty scholarship was born in the calles, prisons, street corners, community centers, welfare offices, shelters, kitchen tables, assembly lines, tenements, favelas, projects, and ghettos—all the places people don’t look for educators, experts, leaders, researchers, lecturers, linguists, artists, creative thinkers, writers, and media producers

With this powerful book Tiny and other poverty skolaz at POOR Magazine hope to change the discourse on poverty and homelessness, land use, service provision, education, advocacy and philanthropy for communities in poverty and has included original art and words from known and unknown poverty, disability, indigenous skolaz, poets and teachers such as Leroy Moore, Al and Tony Robles, Corrina Gould, Joey Villarreal, Muteado Silencio, Vivian Flaherty, Queennandi Xsheba Shabazz, Frances Moore and many more.

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/539746633161697

4.  Sunday, 2:00pm – 4:30pm, Visionaries: Indigenous organizers protecting land

Oakstop

1721 Broadway

Oakland

ACCESSIBILITY INFO
Sliding scale donation of $0-$15 suggested.
Childcare will be available (please RSVP to childcare@collectiveliberation.org by Tuesday the 19th)
We will be providing projected live transcription (CART)
This event is fully wheelchair accessible. 
We will be livestreaming this event from the Facebook event page.

From Hawaii to New York and beyond, Indigenous people are leading and winning fights to protect people, the planet and what is sacred. At a time when the need to confront rising climate chaos, a white supremacist state and a white nationalist movement is incredibly clear, Indigenous people are showing the way forward. As our friends at the NDN Collective say, “If we want to transform the world, our vision has to be as great as the challenges we are faced with.” 

Come listen to, learn from, and be inspired by the visionaries who have been organizing at the forefront of these movements, from Ohlone territories in Oakland, to Standing Rock to Bayou Bridge. We will be joined by Corrina Gould, Chochenyo-Ohlone, Mark Tilsen, Oglala Lakota, and Wahleah Johns, Navajo

Sponsor: Catalyst Project

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1960382950725853/

5.  Sunday, 4:00pm – 6:00pm, Get Organized for an Actual Revolution Tour

Revolution Books Berkeley

2444 Durant Ave.

Berkeley

Price: $5 – $10

This System Cannot Be Reformed, It Must Be Overthrown!” 

The Get Organized for an ACTUAL Revolution Tour 

To you who are fed up with this society and “solutions” that are no solution… 

To you who are angry and defiant and want to see an end to the white supremacy, the patriarchy and its many forms of gender oppression, the persecution of immigrants, the imperialist wars and occupations and threats, and the capitalist plunder and destruction of the environment—an end to all, or any, of the horrible forms of oppression and exploitation that define and intertwine with this capitalist-imperialist society… 

Read the whole call at https://revcom.us/a/582/the-get-organized-for-an-actual-revolution-tour-en.html

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2019/02/17/18821225.php

Monday, February 25

6.  Monday, 5:30pm, All out at the school board to stop spending cuts and AB 1840

1050 2nd Ave.

Oakland

5:30 Rally
6:00 Meeting starts

The school board will be holding a special meeting to approve over $20M in spending cuts in 19-20. These cuts include $3M in cuts directly from schools and laying off nearly 150 central staff. They plan on making this vote even though there is currently an unexplained $60M increase in expenditures and our teachers are on strike. This is unacceptable and as we say it’s#FailureByDesign.

We need an all out effort to stop the school board from voting on spending cuts for next year. The school board has until March 1st to approve these cuts to qualify for AB 1840. We also need to demand that the school board direct the superintendent to settle a fair contract with our teachers.

Sponsor: Oakland Public Education Network

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2347934678754882/

Tuesday, February 26

7.  Tuesday, 10:45am – 1:45pm, Urban Shield is Gone – Let’s Keep it That Way!

Alameda County Offices – Board of Supervisors

1221 Oak St.

Oakland

The Alameda County Board of Supervisors voted to “end Urban Shield as it is currently constituted” in March of 2018 
They appointed a task force (the second one) to figure out how to do that.
The task force has created a set of recommendations that would radically transform Urban Shield from a militarized SWAT and weapons expo.

Recommendations include:

1. An end to the weapons show and the use of the exercises to feature weapons and privatized military-like gadgets and devices for crowd control and surveillance. 

2. An end to the SWAT competition

3. The re-allocation of $5 million dollars to public health and social services agencies for disaster preparedness and resilency after catastrophe.

It is now upon the Supervisors to make good on their committment by approving the Task Force’s recommendations. To do this they will likely have to overcome intense opposition and pushback.

If you can’t attend, you can write to the Board with an easy one-click action here: (hosted by Media Alliance)

https://media-alliance.salsalabs.org/UrbanShieldAgain

Sponsors: Oakland Privacy, Media Alliance, Stop Urban Shield, Stop Watching Us, The Day We Fight Back

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/425279881542611/

8.  Tuesday, 6:00pm – 7:15pm, Four years later: Remembering Amilcar

Start at where Amilcar was killed.

Folsom St. (between 24th & 25th Streets)

SF

Then walking to site of his new mural 24th & Capp Streets

On February 26, 2015, SFPD Officers Craig Tiffe and Eric Reboli killed Amilcar on Folsom Street, firing six bullets to his back as he was fleeing for his life. For many months after his killing, our community marched, picketed, stood in vigils, held press conferences and many, many meetings, all in the hope of obtaining justice through the legal system. That legal process utterly failed; the DA filed no criminal charges against the officers, and the civil case was settled out of court.

But we have not forgotten. And we won’t. We are creating a beautiful mural to remind us of this young Guatemalan immigrant’s story.

Four years after his killing, on Tuesday, February 26, we will gather once more at the site where Amilcar was killed. We will remember his story and hold his family in Guatemala in our hearts. Then we will walk a short distance to 24th and Capp Streets where Amilcar’s mural is being created. We will see the latest sketches and hear from Precita Eyes muralist Carla Wojczuk who has been designing the mural with input from the youth from H.O.M.E.Y. And, now that the actual painting is about to begin, we will offer a brief blessing of this work of love.


Bring whatever songs, poems, stories, and reflections you may have, and, if you like, a small snack to share.

About Amilcar:

Amilcar Perez-Lopez was a 21-year-old Guatemala immigrant shot to the back six times by San Francisco police on February 26, 2015 as he was running for his life.

Amilcar came to the U.S. when he was 17 to earn money for his family in Guatemala. He worked at construction sites and restaurants throughout San Francisco. Friends and coworkers remember him as a hardworking, thoughtful, generous young man. He provided for his family, sending remittances back home, fruit of his hard labor.

Amilcar is survived by his loving parents and five younger siblings back home in Guatemala. He also had a significant other in San Francisco. His close family and friends affectionately called him “Mica”.

Sponsor: Justice for Amilcar Perez-Lopez

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/360776951317656/?active_tab=about

9.  Tuesday, 6:00pm – 8:00pm, Meeting of Labor Rise for Climate, Jobs, Justice & Peace

Unite Here Local 2

209 Golden Gate Ave.

SF

At this meeting we will decide campaign priorities, including Green New Deal and anti-militarism campaigns, and the Alameda Labor Council Climate Convergence on April 13. We will decide whether to become an affiliate of Labor for Sustainability. 

PLEASE LET US KNOW IF YOU WILL ATTEND BY CLICKING ON “GOING” SO WE HAVE ENOUGH FOOD TO KEEP EVERYONE HAPPY. Feel free to bring food to share.

Draft Proposals:

Green New Deal: 
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1h_u6UwSNeVfCmry3GEvuaT6r_CBOUcfg6N4sIVmkPvY

Anti-militarism: 
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ZtAcNj77Otm8RKG8ERjCDUPxDgqN7IOXw8cwloSnPL4

Affiliation with LNS:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qtSVquuXOkFDUULnwF0L1JHlGBSf45c1s6vlRJreGX0/edit?usp=sharing

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/479368575928919/

10. Tuesday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Don’t Displace Oakland’s Black Community!

Faith Alliance for a Moral Economy

360 14th St.

Oakland

Email or Call David Brazil to see where the meeting is.

All out for City Council on Tuesday, February 26 to demand written commitment to community benefits for the proposed Mandela hotel. 

Development without community benefits = displacement of Oakland’s Black community!

To get involved please contact Pastor David Brazil at 510-508-7104 or david@workingeastbay.org

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/291774831408070/

11. Tuesday, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Deport ICE Berkeley – The Vote

Berkeley City Council

1231 Addison St.

Berkeley

The item is the first item on the action calender and will likely be heard between 7:30pm and 9:00pm

The Sanctuary City Contracting Ordinance will keep the money of Berkeley’s residents from lining the pockets of companies that collaborate directly with the Trump administration’s
lawless and unconstitutional immigration policies. 

The contracting ordinance will phase out gradually the use of vendors that supply ICE with information that helps them to better terrorize immigrant communities. Combined with similar actions by other Bay Area cities, the ordinance will send the message that it isn’t good business to separate young children from their parents,
violate asylum seekers constitutional rights and lock people up in private immigration detention facilities like Adelanto and Otay Mesa that don’t conform to UN human rights standards.

Berkeley’s money should not be spent on feeding the deportation pipeline when there are alternatives available and the contracting ordinance will make sure as little of our money as possible will be going to ICE data brokers.

Sponsors: Oakland Privacy, Freedom for Immigrants Bay Area + 4 Other Groups

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/450457115491554/

Wednesday, February 27

12. Wednesday, 11:30am – 1:00pm, Commemoration of Wounded Knee 1973

Department of Justice

450 Golden Gate Ave.

SF

“Liberation Day” Commemoration of the Warriors At Wounded Knee 1973, February 27, 2019, held at noon time rally/vigil from11:30-1 pm at Dept. of Justice, 450 Golden Gate Street. Speakers, Drum, songs, sage, Dancers and poetry! Call 415-577-1492 for more information!

For more event information:  http://www.aim-west.org

Info: https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2019/02/13/18821154.php

13. Wednesday, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Lobbying for Sweeps Hearing

SF City Hall

1 Dr. Carleton B. Goodlett Pl.

SF 

Come to City Hall to encourage the Supervisors to show up and support Matt Haney’s Hearing on Rainstorm Sweeps. We’ll walk around to each Supervisor’s office and convey the importance of this hearing. All are welcome, there’s no need to speak if you don’t want to. We’ll meet outside the front entrance of City Hall at 2pm.

Background: SFPD and the Department of Public Works (DPW), collaborating with the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing, have continued the cruel and inhumane practice of “sweeps”, forced relocation and property confiscation of those living on the streets. During the last two rainstorms we know that DPW and SFPD confiscated tents, sleeping bags, and survival gear handed out by DSA SF and allies, leaving people with no way to protect themselves from the elements. Very few politicians in SF have been willing to own up to sweeps being official city policy, but Sup. Haney has given us a rare opportunity to spotlight the lack of services available during winter storms and the ensuing sweeps

Sponsor: DSA of SF, Glide, Harvey Milk LGBTQ, Coalition on Homelessnes, Indivisible SF

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/631169830629609/

14. Wednesday 6:00pm – 9:00pm, Honoring 104 Years of the Redstone Labor Temple!

2940 16th St.

SF

FREE

Join us and the rest of the community to honor 104 years of organizing towards social and economic justice by the tenants of San Francisco’s historic Redstone Labor Temple!

live music, artists, dancers, poets y performers

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1671690786329290/

15. Wednesday, 6:30pm – 7:30pm, Boycott Manny’s and its “Woke-Washing” of the Mission

Manny’s

16th & Valencia St.

SF

STOP THE WOKE-WASHING OF THE MISSION

We are a group of black and brown folks, Jews, Mission Housing tenants, trans and queer people, and many others, who are committed to collective liberation. We are 
calling for a community boycott of Manny’s (3092 16th at Valencia, SF) because this new upscale wine bar is yet another gentrifying attack on our community. While Manny’s bills itself as a “community space”, it’s marketed toward white ruling class techies, and its programming often features right-wing politicians who are supported by the luxury condo industry. While Manny’s is on the ground floor of a low-income building run by Mission Housing, its residents had no say in its placement. While countless Latinx cultural spaces are evicted from the Mission, Sam Moss who runs Mission Housing, gave Manny’s a reduced rent. 

The owner of Manny’s has worked with Bay Area Zionist organizations. Zionism is a racist ideology that believes Palestinian people have no claim to their land. Zionists, through the state of Israel, enforce this ideology by murdering, arresting, torturing, and displacing generations of Palestinian people. We stand against Zionism, gentrification, anti-Semitism, and all other forms of oppression. 

Manny’s is part of a systematic attempt to make gentrification and racism seem “cool” through woke-washing. Woke-washing is the strategy of putting a “social justice” façade on oppressive politics.



JOIN US EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30PM 

Endorsed by 
Black and Brown for Peace Justice and Equality; 
The Lucy Parsons Project; 
Palestinian Youth Movement – Bay Area; 
Brown Beret National Organization; 
National Brown Berets; 
International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network; 
Queers Undermining Israeli Terrorism; 
Jews Against Zionism; 
GAY SHAME: A Virus in the System 

Please honor this Boycott! By NOT attending or scheduling events there. Let Manny know why.

~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/1df2f51e18d817919a1845ecf/images/25c49e7d-fe6d-4afe-8385-66bb1f7a96b6.jpg

Here There camp 2nd anniversary celebration

Here There camp in Berkeley, California

First they came for the homeless on Facebook

February 22, 2019

Today at camps second anniversary celebration, I noticed a few familiar faces. The faces belonged to homeless I have seen on the streets of Berkeley for years. I remember how they looked. Stressed, tired, worn out. Today I saw smiling eyes in all of them. I saw enjoyment. They were happy. They were relaxed. Why? Because they were home. Without a house.

The city has done very little voluntarily to help us. They spent a lot of money trying to stop us. Now it’s been two years. Every time I go there, it’s a little further down the block. Every time I go there, I see a lot of new faces. To me, that means a decent amount of people are moving on.

And a few have come back. I saw a few old friends. Considering these peoples issues, I’m very happy camp has become a safety net for them. Without camp, it would be a doorway, to a mental breakdown.

Thank you to all the current and former residents of the Here There camp. This is happening because of you. You made it work.

See you in a year.